BackSquares from Northern Junket



Progress report:  I've finished volume 6.

By Volume:

Alphabetically:

Abe's DonegalAll American HashAntigonish SquareAroostook SpecialAround Just OneAtlantic Polka QuadrilleThe Bachelor MillBachelor's ShackBattle Hymn of the RepublicBig Square From Prince Ed…Big Square From Prince Edward IslandBirdie Fly AwayBirdie in the CageBring Home Your CornerBuffalo GalsBunkhouse ReelCanadian LancersCanadian SquareLa CardeuseChain 'em Left and RightCircle Three & Balance FourClimbing up de Golden StairsCock of the NorthContra SquareCorners of the HallThe Crooked StovepipeThe Crooked StovepipeDarling Nellie GrayDo si do and face the sidesDoodahDoodarDuck to the CenterLa Favorite de MontrealFlower Girl Waltz QuadrilleFollow the LeaderLa GigeuseLa Gigue a 8Girl I Left Behind MeGlossary of French Canadia…Glossary of French Canadian Calls & FiguresGo halfway roundGo Half-way RoundGo Through and ChainGolden SlippersThe HaystackHeads and SidesHofbrau SquareHonest John Part OneHonest John Part TwoHot Time in the Old Town T…Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight (circle)Hot Time in the Old Town T…Hot Time in the Old Town TonightIt's a Long Way to TipperaryJingle BellsJingle Bells SquareJust BecauseKitty CornerThe Ladies SwitcherooLady round the LadyLittle Brown JugLoomis Lancers, figures 1-3Loomis Lancers, final figureMontreal BreakthroughNancy's FancyNine-PinOld Fall River LineOld Fall River LineOld Joe ClarkOld-Time Square from Conn.Plain QuadrillePlain Quadrille New Brunsw…Plain Quadrille New Brunswick stylePolka QuadrillePresque Isle EightRed River ValleyReel of Woodview DellSet de St. AdeleSet des JalouxSet RusticSet Salle St. AndreSet Salle St. DenisThe SkimmeltonSolomon LeviSomebody GoofedSpecial Maritimes issueStar and ChainStrawberries and RaspberriesSwing Two LadiesThree French-Canadian fig…Three French-Canadian figuresThree Hand StarThree Ladies ChainVive la CompaigneWait For The WagonWaltz ChassezWaltz QuadrilleWearin' o' the greenWhen the bloom is on the s…When the bloom is on the sageWhen the Work's All Done T…When the Work's All Done This FallWhirligig and Cheat (1)Whirligig and Cheat (2)Wreck of the Number NineYankee Doodle

Ralph PageRalph Page published 165 issues of the magazine “Northern Junket” for 35 years, from 1949 to 1984.

You can see scans of these at scholars.unh.edu/northern_junket and scholars.unh.edu/northern_junket/index.2.html

There is also an index to all issues of Northern Junket at scholars.unh.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1165&context=northern_junket and on the Internet Archive

The magazine is wide-ranging, including recipes, traditional customs, reminiscences, Ralph's opinions, Folk songs, Contra, Square and International dances — you'll even find Playford's “Geud Man of Ballangigh” in Volume 4 Number 11.  I'm planning to extract the squares and publish them here.  It seems there are over 230 of them, so I may not live to finish the job!  I'm working from the table at the bottom of this page, which will gradually be emptied.  I'm giving the original wording followed in some cases by my comments and the way I would write it out.  No doubt I'll make some mistakes, so please Contact me if you disagree with anything here — I haven't called most of these squares!  I'm also planning to give music links for most of the dances which have a specified non-copyright tune — just click the treble clef icon next to the dance title.  These are traditional tunes so I'm not guaranteeing that they're exactly the versions that Ralph Page used (except for those where he actually gave the musical notation), but they're here and they're chorded — you can see them, hear them and print them out.

While working on Volume 2 I discovered a scanned text version of 2.3 which greatly reduced my typing, though the scanning software inevitably made lots of mistakes, including such interesting instructions as “chain your lady to the loft”, “forward and hack”, etc.

In fact I believe all the issues have been stored on the Internet Archive.  See: archive.org/search.php?query=northern+junket&sort=-date&page=4 and in the “Sort by” field click on “Date (whatever)” and then “Date published”.  It's not totally accurate, but it's a good attempt!  You can read the facsimiles or scroll down and click “Full text” to download the scanned text.  They are quicker to display than the copies on the UNH website, though they appear to be scans of the same originals.  I'm adding “Internet Archive” links as I go through them.  Some issues give month and year; others just give year.  I'm trusting the dates given in the Index.

Read more about Ralph Page on my “What is a Dancing Master?” page.  And for more about traditional squares, see squaredancehistory.org

You can also read the book “History of Square Dancing” by Samuel Foster Damon, published in 1957 and now available on the Internet Archive — well worth a read.

It's interesting to realise that most callers seem to be using recorded music in those days: there are frequent references to particular recordings.  I've also learnt that the way I call squares is known as “Quadrille style” whereas the way they are presented in these magazines, with solid calling and lots of meaningless (or at least unnecessary) verbiage is “Square dance style”.  I learnt this from one of the tapes uploaded to the Internet Archive by Tony Parkes at archive.org/details/rpdlw_1988_1989_202108/ RPDLW+tapes,+1988,+1989/RPDLW+ 1988+Tape+2++Side+A.mp3.  That was on Tape 1 Side B — a caller's workshop with Chip Hendrickson where he demonstrates both styles and teaches a lot more besides.  I'd prefer dance descriptions that explain how the call fits the music rather than specific wording, but maybe that's just my mathematical background.  Anyway, where I've given my understanding of the dances I've usually written it out with A's and B's, following my convention that a full stop (period) marks a 4-bar or 8-bar phrase and a semicolon marks a 2-bar phrase.

When I announced the creation of this page on the Traditional Dance Callers' List, Tony Parkes said:

Sounds like a monumental task, Colin.  More power to you — we need all the easily accessible sources of good squares that we can put in place.

and Amy Cann said:

How neat!  I have a few early copies I picked up as spares at Ralph Page weekend and they make for fascinating reading.

Also, I had to explain to a twenty-something the other day why they were “purple”, which was fun.

They totally didn't believe me about sniffing fresh mimeographs.



Volume 1

Buffalo Gals        Print this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 1, No. 1, April 1949.  Original wording on page 17     Internet Archive
Suggested music: Buffalo Gals
Use any introduction you wish, then -

Head lady lead up to the right
Turn that gent by the right hand around
Back to your partner and left hand around
Lady in the center and seven hands around

Lady comes out with a corner swing
Do the same all round the ring
Leave her alone and swing your own
First gent out to the lady on the right
Turn that lady by the right hand around
Back to your own and the left hand around
Swing her in the center and six hands around
Break that ring and shake 'er down
Do si do with your corners all
Do the same with your own little doll
Allemande left with your corners all
And swing your partners around the hall

Next lady and gent do the same changes, then

Every gentleman lead to the right
Swing that lady with all your might
Now that lady across from you, you swing her and she'll swing you
Now swing that lady on your left, swing her round and round to the west
Now swing your own that you swing best
All promenade around the ring

Next two couples do the same changes in turn then repeat the chorus figure for an ending

The calls would seem to explain themselves, but there may be some question about the “shake 'er down” business.  It takes but six bars of music to go six hands around the couple swinging in the center; the call is given on the seventh and eighth bars of the strain, as the dancers are straightening themselves out from the six hands around.  Everybody faces partner, and on the last measure all do clog steps in place.

Three Hand Star        Wi' a Hundred Pipers an' a': Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 1, No. 2, May 1949.  Original wording on page 17    Internet Archive
Ralph Page
Suggested music: Wi' a Hundred Pipers an' a', an a'
Any introduction you wish, then
Head couple swing inside the ring,
Head lady goes right, head gent goes left,
And make two three hand stars with side couples
(1st lady & 2nd couple join right hands and circle once around; 1st gent & 4th couple join left hands and circle once around)
The other hand back the way you are,
Meet in the center and go on to the next
And make a four hand right hand cross
Then allemande left your corners all
Grand right and left a half way round
Promenade her when you meet, you promenade her home.
Other couples do same figures in turn.

Before starting the call, it helps to have every one take a good look at their corners, for the allemande left is done with your original corners.  There are always a few lost souls who can gaze at their corners till doomsday and not recognise them when the time comes to allemande left.  But don't get discouraged.  'Twas ever thus.
Every caller will relate to that last paragraph!  When Ralph refers to the head couple he means the first couple.  I haven't tried this version, but it seems awkward for the first gent to go from a right-hand star with the fours to a right-hand star with the threes, so here's a variant I learnt from Bernard Chalk.

A1:Ones lead across, split the ring, separate, round the outside back home.
A2:Ones cross over: right-hand star with the opposite side couple.  Cross back: left-hand star with the other side couple.
B1:Ones right-hand star with the threes.  All allemande left corner.
B2:Do-si-do partner.  Swing.

If you want to make it more challenging, you can do:

Break, Figure for Ones, Twos, Break, Figure for Threes, Fours, Break, Figure for Heads, Figure for Sides, Break.

Tony Parkes said:

I just looked at your transcription and Ralph's original notes on Three Hand Star. I think Ralph may have been sleep-deprived when he typed that one out. I've danced it and called it in several versions, and both of the three-hand stars at the beginning were always with right hands, then back with the left.

The Crooked Stovepipe        Crooked Stovepipe: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 1, No. 3, June 1949.  Original wording on page 18    Internet Archive
Any introduction you want provided you use the tune once through; thirty-two measures.  Then:

The head two ladies forward and back
Forward again and the two girls swing
Six hands around them in a great big ring
Break that ring and swing your own, everybody swing
Allemande left your corners
A right hand round your own
You do si do your corners
And do si do your own
You've got time to swing your own alone
Swing her once or twice

Do the same changes for the two side girls also the two head men, and the two side men

This is how I would fit it into 32 bars.

A1:Head ladies forward and back.  Head ladies swing in the middle and immediately the other six start to circle left around them.
A2:Finish the circle left.  All swing partner.
B1:Allemande left corner, allemande right partner, do-si-do corner.
B2:Do-si-do partner.  Swing.
Tony Parkes said:

Crooked Stovepipe is in my new book, with two call charts and a few miscellaneous comments.

Read about Tony's new book: Square Dance Calling: An Old Art for a New Century which is now available.

Girl I Left Behind Me        Brighton Camp: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 1, No. 4, July 1949.  Original wording on page 16    Internet Archive
Adirondack version
Contributed by “Duke” Miller, Gloversville, N.Y.

Introduction
Allow music to run 4 bars4
Bow to your partners one and all2
And to your corner la-a-a-ady.2
The Break
Allemande left the left hand girl
Touch right hands with your partner
Allemande left that right hand girl8
Come back and promenade your own
    (promenade takes 8 more bars)8
The Figure
First old couple lead to the right2
And balance there so kindly2
Walk right through and balance again2
And swing the one behind you2
      Long swing8
Take that new girl to the next
And balance etc. etc.8
      Long swing8
 
Note — at this point each man should be home with a new girl.      
Now insert the complete break including the promenade.
Second couple now does the figure and the break
and as the promenade starts, immediately call:
 
Spin her back and walk the next
She walks with the man behind her
Spin her back and walk the next
She walks with the man behind her16
Spin her back and walk the nextor
She walks with the man behind her24
Spin her back you have your ownif not
So promenade that lady homehome in position
Third couple same as the first,
Fourth couple same as the second.
 
Although description is long, the dance is fast, taking about six minutes to do the whole dance.

The call “spin her back” etc. should be done from New England promenade position as follows:

Raise left hands high, as left feet hit the floor the man exerts a sharp pull with his right hand on girl's waist.  This causes the girl to spin once in place.  At the same time the man keeps moving ahead and the next girl ahead of him should drop onto his right arm in promenade position.

“Walk through and balance again” - girls go thru on inside, and this balance is back to back with that couple.  Thus, when they balance, the first man and second lady are back to back; likewise first lady and second gent are back to back.
For those more familiar with a skaters' hold, New England promenade position is where the man's right hand is on the woman's right hand on her waist, as in a courtesy turn at the end of a ladies chain.

21st century contra dancers will want to take hands with someone and balance forward and back, but that's not what they did in 1949.  In fact in the May 1955 issue of Northern Junket, Dr. Ralph A. Piper wrote an article entitled “50 variations of the balance”, and his first variation is: Step on the right foot, point the toe of the left foot in front of right; repeat to the left“ which is a setting step as you might find in English or Scottish dances.  He points out that: ”The term balance superseded the term “setting” to partners or corners.  So the first time you're setting to your opposite, then pass through right shoulder, and the second setting is to nobody: Miller makes that very clear.

Wait For The Wagon        Wait For The Wagon: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 1, No. 5, August 1949.  Original wording on page 10    Internet Archive
A singing call

Repeat first 8 measures of music.  Do NOT repeat the second eight measures.  This is a 24 measure call.

Introduction
Honor to your partner, the one you love the best
Honor to your corner, the one who's from the West.
Swing your partners one and all, the handsomest girl in the hall.
Promenade your partner, keep a smile upon your face,
While you wait for the wagon, walk around to place.

The Dance:
The head two step inside the ring (1st couple)
Balance there and swing.
The lady steps out to the right
The gent goes to the left.
Go between the two side couples,
Join hands and forward six,
Six fall back on the same old track,
And the head two in again.
They balance in the middle,
Then swing around once more,
Swing her if you love
Up off the old pine floor.
Then balance to the opposite two,
Be careful what you do,
You right and left right over
And you right and left right home.
When you're in your places,
You balance all and swing,
Take the ladies with you, and promenade the ring.
Promenade with your partners, never more to roam,
While you wait for the wagon
You can promenade her home.

[Virtually the same wording for the 2nd couple which I'm not going to type out again.]

(Other two couples do the same changes in turn The third couple going between the two side couples, and the fourth couple going between the head two couples.  Use any ending you wish.)

Swing Two Ladies        The Low Backed Car: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 1, No. 6, October1949.  Original wording on page 14    Internet Archive

Ralph Page
Music: Any Irish jig.  I like to use “The Low Backed Car”

Use any introduction you wish, then:

Join your hands and forward all
Forward again for the good of the hall
The head two men take two girls home.
    (Their corners as well as their partners.  Thus the two head men have their partner at their right and their corner girl beside them at their left.  The two side men stand in place alone.)
Head gents turn partner with right hand around
Their corner lady with the left hand around
They put their arms round both girls' waists
And swing them both around in place.
Open it up in a circle of three
And three hands around you go
Pop the corner lady under
Everybody swing and don't you blunder
And all promenade around the ring.

The figure is repeated for the side gents.  It may also be done for but one man at a time.  It all depends on how the caller is feeling or how much time he has for the figure.

In the swing two ladies figure, it is a lot safer if the two girls join their free hands.  The figure should be done clockwise, and for goodness' sake men, hold on tight.
Tony Parkes said:

Swing Two Ladies is also in my new book.  I hadn't looked at Ralph's notes in a long time; I had forgotten that he envisioned the key move as a line of three going round, with or without the ladies' hands joined.  Ted Sannella and I always taught it as a basket of three.

Battle Hymn of the Republic        John Brown's Body: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 1, No. 7, November 1949.  Original wording on page 16    Internet Archive
Singing Call contributed by “Duke” Miller, Gloversville, NY.

Verse:
Bow to your partners one and all
And to your corners all
Join your hands and circle eight
Go eight hands around
The other way back, you're going wrong
Back to places all
Yes, back to places all.
Chorus:
Do-si-do with your corners do-si-do
Do-si-do with your partners do-si-do
Allemande left with your corners
Come back and you swing your own.

Figure:
Verse:
The head couple promenade the outside of the ring,
All the rest will follow round and listen while I sing.
Come up through the center and stand four in line
Salute your partners all.
Verse:
Head couple do-si-do your partner do-si-do
Next couple elbow swing, your partner elbow swing,
Third couple do-si-do your partner do-si-do
And the last ones elbow swing.
Chorus:
Now everybody forward and everybody back
Once again and pass 'em through and meet 'em coming back
You swing her when you meet her
You swing her round and round
You swing to places all.

Repeat figure with 2nd, 3rd, & 4th couples leading in turn.

Conclusion:
Verse:
Allemande your corner and grand right and left
Your own with the right, the next with the left
When you meet your partner - there you reverse
Hurry back the other way cause you are getting worse.
Chorus:
Swing your own when you get home
You swing her round and round
And after you have swung her, you promenade to town
Thank your partner kindly, that is all.

Note: When couple #2 or 4 leads up through the center the lines go cross-wise of the hall.

“Duke” Miller is Athletic Director of the high school in Gloversville, Hew York.  This is one of many square dance calls he has collected from that vicinity and northern York state.  He tells us that he never heard but one elderly man use this call as given here.  Duke was kind enough to take us out to dinner one night last summer and over our second cup of coffee sang this dance for its.

Duke is doing a grand job with his own high school  group, and various PTA meetings around his section of the state.  Sometime we hope to needle him into contributing an article about his work out there in New York state.

Old Joe Clark        Old Joe Clark: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 1, No. 8, December 1949.  Original wording on page 12 (actually page 58 in the PDF)    Internet Archive
The Dance
Introduction
Join your hands and all around,
Eight hands once around,
Guess you've got the rhrumatiz,
Don't believe you'll ever get round.
Break and swing your partners all,
Exactly as I say,
Swing your ladies everyone
Before they run away.
Figure
The first couple promenade
The outside of the ring,
Take your steps in double time,
You haven't time to sing.
Balance corners round the hall,
You balance one and all,
Swing your partners round and round,
Swing her to the wall,
Right arm to your partner, boys,
And grand allemande,
Reel your own girl once around,
And pass on to the next.
Meet that girl with a left arm whirl,
Then pass on to the next,
Give that girl your good right arm,
And reel just once around.
Now the next one by the left,
By the left arm reel,
Here's your own ahead of you,
Reel her by the right,
Pass right by, say good-bye,
See you tomorrow night.
Reel the ladies all around,
But don't you hug 'em tight,
First the right and then the left,
You allemande right on,
What'll we do for pork and beans
When Joe Clark's dead and gone?
Reel, reel, everybody reel,
Until you all get home.
When you're home, stand in place
With a big smile on your face.
                *
Next two promenade around
The outside of the set,
You haven't time to say good-bye,
But do not sigh or fret.
Promenade everyone, promenade the hall,
Walk around with Old Joe Clark,
He ain't been here since fall.
All join hands and circle eight
Around Old Joe Clark's gate,
If you stop to spark the girls
You won't get home 'til late.
Swing your partners all around,
Swing 'em night and day,
Swing hard with Old Joe Clark,
He ain't got long to stay.
                *
Third couple promenade around the outside,
Don't know why she married you,
She's such a handsome bride.
Balance once to your corners all,
Balance all around, swing your partners everyone,
Swing 'em up and down,
All promenade with Old Joe Clark,
Promenade I say.
Don't marry a man with whiskers on
They're always in the way.
Promenade the other way, the other way around,
Walk along with Old Joe Clark
The other way down town.
                *
Last couple take a promenade
Around the outside,
hurry right along to place,
With your lady by your side.
All join hands and circle eight,
Until you all get straight.
When you're home you swing all out,
Swing your partner inside out.
Swing your honey and swing your beau,
Swing 'em fast, swing 'em slow.
Then step right back and make a bow
To your partners all.
                *
Ending
Right hand to your partners now,
And grand right and left,
Grand chain half the way,
And promenade back home.
Promenade Old Joe Clark, promenade I say,
Promenade with Old Joe Clark,
As you've done many a day.
Promenade around the hall
With your lady right beside yer,
Thank the fiddlers one and all,
And I'll take a glass of cider.

There it is friends, exactly the way we used to call it a few years ago.  Word for word.  The calls explain themselves.  The grand allemande is known in some sections of the country as the “once and a half”.  Call it what you've a mind to.  But keep reeling once around with everyone you meet completely round the set.
That was a lot to type — for Ralph and now for me!  It's interesting that towards the end he says “grand right and left” which is the American term, and follows it immediately with “grand chain” which is the term used in the quadrilles and still the term we use in England and Scotland today (2021).

Honest John Part One        Honest John: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 1, No. 9, January 1950.  Original wording on page 14    Internet Archive
The first couple out to the right
And balance with the two,
Join your hands and circle to the left
And then here's what you do.
You chassez by, address your opposite
Chassez back, address your own
Then right and left the way you are-
Ar-r-re, ar-r-re.
Right and left back to place
And the ladies grand chain.
All promenade your partners.

Other couples do the same changes in turn.

The Dance

First couple walk to their right, stopping in front of the second couple.  Both couples balance with each other, by taking two short steps toward each other and two short steps back.  They then join hands and go four hands around once.  Release hands.  The first couple should be about in the middle of the set, with their backs to fourth couple.  Couples 1 & 2 chassez by partners with four short walking steps, gents to their right, ladies to their left, ladies passing in front of partners.  The two men now bow to the opposite ladies (man 1 bows to 2nd lady, man 2 bows to 1st lady) who curtsey to them.  Repeat the figure in opposite direction, bow and curtsey to own partners.  Couples 1 & 2 do regular right and left figure, over and back.  Then all four ladies do grand chain: 1st & 3rd ladies join right hands, 2nd and 4th ladies do the same.  This makes a star.  In this position ladies walk to their own left half around the set to opposite man.  Ladies release their right hand star, give left hand to that opposite man who takes the lady's left in his left and turns her once around, counter clockwise as in regular ladies chain; ladies now step to center of the set, join right hands once more in a star and circle to own left half way round the set to own partner, release right hand star, give left hand to partner who turns them once around as in regular ladies chain.  All promenade partners once around the set.  The other couples do same figure in their turn.

This is the short way of doing the dance.  Originally, each couple visited every other couple in the set doing the same figure with all of them in turn.  This made a very long dance out of the first part of Honest John, and it was gradually shortened; first by omitting the promenade around the set, and then by having each couple do the figure with the couple on their right.  We saw this dance done this short way at the Vermont Country Dance Festival, Plainfield, eight or nine years ago,  The tune and calls are exactly as the group from West Newbury danced them.  The caller was Charles DuBois, now of Amherst, Mass.  Later, we obtained the same version from Mr. Brummer, Swiftwater, N.H.

Mr Brunner wrote that Honest John was always danced in his town, for the first dance after intermission.  And that all the dancers on the floor joined the caller in singing the figure “chassez by, address your opposite, chassez back, address your own.  Right and left the way you ar-re, ar-r-re, right and left back to place and all four ladies chain”.  Try it this way, you will get a big kick out of it and the dance will mean a lot more to you.

Honest John was originated by the Van Orman family who once lived in Newbury, Vermont.  It is known to be at least 75 years old and is probably nearer 100.  The Van Ormans were a large and very musical family, who came to eastern Vermont from New York State.  Many of the family are yet living in Vermont, and they are a musical family to this very date.
A beautifully clear and detailed description of the dance — would that John Playford had done the same!  This time the balance is specified as forward and back, so that may have been the way it was done in “Girl I Left Behind Me” — but again, no taking hands.  Notice that it's an open ladies chain, not a courtesy turn with an arm round the waist.  The dance is clearly descended from the 19th century quadrille — Mr Brummer dates it to probably around 1850.  If you don't know about quadrilles and think this sort of square is a purely American invention, you need to learn more about its background!  See for instance my page on Connections.

In earlier times the chassez would have been a sideways slip-step rather than a walk, known by the French title of chassé-croisé and used for instance in “La Russe”.

I've given the melody as Ralph Page notated it, except for one bar where I think he put three notes too low (a mistake I've made many times) and I've added chords.  It's strongly related to “Brighton Camp / The Girl I Left Behind Me” but with an extra section in the middle.

Tony Parkes says:

I agree with you about the three wrong notes in Ralph's score.  In addition, I think the quaver just before the last D7 chord should be a G, not an F#.

It does look as if an open left-hand turn is being described in the ladies' grand chain.  However, it says “as in regular ladies chain”; we'd have to know how that was done in that community to be sure.  I wonder how the right and left was done; there's no description.

I danced this to Dudley Laufman's calling in 1965 or 1966.  Dud called it just as it's given here except that he said “Everybody swing” instead of the ladies' grand chain.  Yes, he called for a 16-count swing.

I've now changed the note that Tony queried.  The tune is 40 bars with no repeats, and the words fit the tune, the second line with its slow notes for “You chassez by, address your opposite.  Chassez back, address your own”.

A:First couple out to the right to face second couple (4 steps); both couples balance forward and back.  Circle left.
B:Walk past partner, ladies in front; bow/curtsey to opposite.  Walk past partner, again ladies in front; bow/curtsey to partner.
C:Right and left through, and back, first couple finishing home.
D:All four ladies chain across and back (with an open left-hand turn).
E:Promenade.

Honest John Part Two        Honest John Part Two: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 1, No. 10, February 1950.  Original wording on page 17    Internet Archive
The first two give right hands around
Keep your steps in time
Left hand back the other way
And balance four in line.
SWING (usually, but not always, spoken)
The head two ladies chain.
Head two couples half promenade
And half right and left to place.

The next two give right hands around
Keep your steps in time
Left hand back the other way
And balance four in line.
SWING (usually, but not always, spoken)
The side two ladies chain.
Side two couples half promenade
And half right and left to place.

Repeat same changes for other couples

an ending

Allemande left your corner girl
A right hand round your own
You do si do your corner lady
And promenade your own.

The Dance

The first lady and third gent step to the center of set, join right hands and walk once around; releasing right hands they join their left hands and walk back the other way.  They keep hold of left hands, join right hands with partner and balance that way four in line.  This balance step is a short step forward and one short step back.  All swing partners.  Couples 1 & 3 do a regular ladies chain.  Same two couples promenade across the set, turning around in the opposites couples place and do a right and left home to place.

Then the second lady and fourth gent give right hands once around, etc.  Side two couples ladies chain, half promenade and half right and left to place.  Other couples do similar figures in turn.
This is also clearly derived from the Quadrille.  It's a mixture of figures 3 and 1 of The Plain Quadrille, with a swing and an ending added to make it American.  No connection with the previous dance except that I assume it was traditionally danced as a set with Part One.  I've set it as Ralph wrote it except that I'm sure he meant B rather than C in bar 24.  Tony Parkes says:

The names of the tunes are not given, but in a narrative account of a kitchen junket in another issue of NJ, Ralph identified the first tune as “I Can't Untie the Knot” (granted the “A” strain sounds a lot like “Boil Dem Cabbage Down”). The second tune is, of course, Old Zip Coon or Turkey in the Straw. No repeats of any of the strains.

Here's Ralph calling part 2. The ending uses just the two strains of Can't Untie.

That's so useful!  Now you can see exactly how the call fits the music, and the points where there's no call — how would you have known that from reading the magazine?  The tempo is123 beats per minute.

Figure:
A:First lady and third gent right-hand turn.  Back with a left-hand turn, keep hold and give right to partner forming a wave up and down.
B:Balance forward and back once; swing partner for 6 bars, finishing back in the square.
C:Head ladies chain across and back.
D:Heads half promenade (inside the set).  Right and left through to place.
Ending:
A:Allemande left corner, allemande right partner, do-si-do corner.
B:Promenade partner.

Reel of Woodview Dell        The Kerry Dance: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 1, No. 11, March 1950.  Original wording on page 17    Internet Archive
Julia Dwyer
Music: The Kerry Dance

Right elbow swing with your partner,
Gents move one place to the left and bow to that lady,
Ladies move one place to the left.
All do si do where you are,
All balance there and pass by
To the next and swing that lady and promenade home (original corners ½ round to gent's place)
All left elbow swing new partner,
Ladies move one place to the left and honor,
Then all do si do that lady,
All balance the same and pass by,
Swing next lady and promenade home.

Repeat from beginning until all the ladies are back home.

Vive la Compaigne        Print this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 1, No. 12, April 1950.  Original wording on page 15    Internet Archive
from Paul Hunt

Intro:
Allemande left, as you come down you
Swing your partners all around.
Allemande left with the corner again
And a grand right and left.
Hand over hand around the track,
Keep on going 'til you get back.
All the way boys and girls all the way.

Figure:
First lady go right and the gent to the left
Around the outside you go.
You do si do with the gal of your dreams
You do the do si do.
Take her in your arms and swing
Promenade back home again
Hurry hurry hurry hurry swing your corner girl.
Oh you swing that girl then leave her alone
Go right back and swing your own
Swing that girl till she's out of breath
Now we do the allemande left.
Left hand around your corners all
Promenade your partners all

(Repeat for other three couples in turn.  then two head couples at same time, then side two couples, then all four couples.)

The call is self explanatory.  But when you promenade after the do si do and swing it is in the direction THE GENT WAS GOING.

Paul Hunt is one of the finest callers in the country.  This call is from his forthcoming album on the Michael Herman Folk Dance Series soon to be released.  The album is a MUST.
OK, I wouldn't have guessed that the promenade was clockwise — in my experience it's always the man on the inside.  Presumably that's why it's in capitals.



Volume 2

Bachelor's Shack        Print this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 2, No. 1, June 1950.  Original wording on page 17    Internet Archive
…  Al Brundage of Stepney, Conn. was the next guest caller. Al called “Just Because,” “Marching through Georgia” the version where everyone marches around, and for his third call Al used “Bachelor's Shack” which was something that the dancers were not used to around this section.  After lining the ladies up with the side gents the call went like this:

Forward up six and back
Forward up six and the ladies stand there
The gents go back to the bachelor's shack
    (Four ladies are standing in the center)
The first gent does:
Right hand round with your right hand lady
    (with the # 1 lady)
Left hand round with your left hand lady
    (with the # 4 lady)
Right hand round with your right hand lady
    (with the # 2 lady)
Left hand round with your left hand lady
    (with the # 3 lady)
This brings 1st gent to 3rd gent's place.
Elbow round with your left hand lady
    (this leaves # 1 gent in position to--)
Left hand round with your left hand lady
    (lady # 2)
Right hand round with your right hand lady
    (lady # 3)
Left hand round with your left hand lady
    (lady # 1)
Right hand round with your right hand lady
    (lady # 4)
Allemande left with your left hand,
dance right into a right and left grand, etc.
Then repeat for other men.

I'm not surprised they were confused!  Referring to your partner as “your right hand lady” is surely asking for trouble, especially when the next time it really does mean your right hand lady — and then there are two meanings for “your left hand lady” — first corner, then opposite.  I'm wondering if “Elbow round with your left hand lady” should really be “Right elbow round with your opposite man” (which would indeed leave the gent in position for “Left hand round with your left hand lady”), and that's because I know a dance called “The Bachelor Mill” which was published in the book “Advanced Square Dance Figures of the West and Southwest” by Lee Owens, Palo Alto, California: Pacific Books, 1950.  That dance is clearly derived from “Bachelor's Shack” though it has both head men leading the figure instead of just one.  You can see a facsimile of the book and below is how I call it.  I learnt the dance from Bill Litchman who had changed the order in which the men visit the women to make it easier to memorise, but after trying his version a few times I decided I preferred the original.  However I like Bill's addition of all four men doing the figure at once — that's great fun (for the caller)!

I can't find Bill's version on the Lloyd Shaw website any more, but it's held on the Internet Archive.

Tony Parkes says:

I agree 100 percent that “Elbow round with your left hand lady” is a typo.  (There are countless typos in Ralph's dance transcriptions.)  Every version of this dance I've seen in print or danced to live calling has the head two gents right elbow swing at this point.

I never had any trouble getting people to turn the ladies in the correct order. Once the side gents are out of the way, the ladies are standing in a little square. The active gent simply turns the one on the right, the one on the left, the next one on the right, and the next one on the left.

I learned this figure by dancing it to the calling of Dick Kraus at Columbia University in the 1960s.  Dick let me practice calling to his group, one figure a week, for several years.  In his book Recreation Leader's Handbook (1955), he says it “has been credited to Ivan Mardis, of Tucson, Arizona.”  (Other writers credit it to various other callers.)  In the book, Dick ends it with “Four little sisters form a ring, Go once around and then you swing” and “promenade.”  At Columbia his ending was a bit more elaborate: Four little sisters form a ring (i.e. ladies circle in the center), do-si-do partner, four gents star right once and a bit to the corner, allemande left, grand right and left halfway, and promenade home.

You can borrow a copy of “Recreation Leader's Handbook” at archive.org/details/recreationleader00krau

The Bachelor Mill        Print this danceTop of page

Dance and call arranged by Jimmy Clossin of El Paso, Texas, from an original dance by George Waudby of Tucson, Arizona.

 Heads lead to the right, circle left, head gents go home.
 Lines of three forward and back; lone men forward and back.
 Lines forward; those men fall back.  [All overlapped]
 Head men turn partner R, corner L, Right-hand lady R, opposite lady L.  Each other R elbow once.
 Now reverse it: opposite lady L, right-hand lady R, corner L, partner R.
 All balance to partner, allemande left corner, ladies star right.
 Men wheel your partner out of the star and promenade one place around the set, wheel around and promenade back again, wheel around and promenade all the way round in the usual direction.
 Bill Litchman's addition: After head men and side men have led the figure, all four men lead it — they do a right-hand star rather than a right-elbow turn.

I tell the head men to point at — and recognise — their partner, their corner, their right-hand lady and their opposite lady, and explain that they'll be turning them in that order and the ladies will be right where they are now.  People think I'm being unnecessarily pedantic, but then when I start the walkthrough there's general confusion and someone will say, “Colin, can you go through the order again please?”.

Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight        Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 2, No. 2, July 1950.  Original wording on page 16    Internet Archive
As called by Priscilla Darling
Any introduction you wish, then---

First couple balance, and first couple swing
First couple promenade the outside of the ring
When you're home I'll tell you what to do
There'll be a hot time in the old town tonight.
Go down the center two, and four go back (1st & 3)
Down the center four, head two cast off six
When you meet, swing at the head and foot (1 & 3)
There'll be a hot time in the old town tonight.
Go down the center as before, and four go back
Down once more and cast off four,
When you meet, swing at the head and foot
There'll be a hot time in the old town tonight.
Go down the center as before, and four go back
Down the center, and cast off two,
When you meet, it's everybody swing
There'll be a hot time in the old town tonight.
Allemande left, and grand right and left
Half way round, and promenade back home,
Promenade, promenade your own,
Then you bow to your partners one and all.

    Other couples do the same in turn

    Use any ending you wish

After their opening solo the ones lead across to meet the threes, pull them back till the ones are home, push them till the threes are home, then the ones split the threes, separate, go round the outside back home, and both head couples swing.  Lead, pull and push as before, and this time the ones separate and go through the gaps between the threes and a side couple, go around that side couple and both head couples swing at home.  Lead, pull and push as before, and this time the ones separate and go through the nearer side couple, go around one person, and everybody swing at home.

Tony Parkes adds:

Granted, this makes for a bit of a snooze fest for the other couples.  I've seen a few attempts at livening things up, including a right and left across for the sides after Couple 1's first and second trips through the middle.

This has no connection with the better known singing square (still current in England in the 21st century) which you can see at barndances.org.uk/detail.php?Title=Hot_Time_in_the_Old_Town_Tonight, though there's a later circle mixer which probably forms the basis of that square.

Tony Parkes says:

In the late 1940s and early 1950s there was much less standardization — in general, and specifically in the matter of what figure belonged with what tune in a singing call.  Dick Kraus used to call two different figures to Hot Time (depending on the crowd, not together as a medley): the one you link to, with “pick up two” and the allemandes, and also a version of “ladies to the center back to back, gents run around the outside track.” The book “One Hundred and One Singing Calls” (Frank Lyman Jr, 1951) has six transcriptions of figures to this tune, although some are merely slight variations of the others.

Just Because        Print this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 2, No.3, September 1950.  Original wording on page 22    Internet Archive
as called by Duke Miller of Gloversville, N.Y

Introduction
Just everybody bow to your partner
And now to your corner as well
You allemande left and you grand right and left
Half way around to your pal
You re-verse her when you meet your partner
Then right and left back the other way
And when you are home
You will all swing your own
Because, Just Because.

Figure
The head two girls chain over
And chain those ladies home once more
The side two janes will ladies chain
Chain them across the floor
You do si do with your corner
And swing your lady just once around
Then take the corner maid
And all promenade and
You sing Because, Just Because.

Break (following each figure)
You do si do with your corner
Come back and do si do your own
Allemande left with the one on your left
And allemande right with your own
Allemande left - grand right and left
Half way around to your maid
Then you take that maid
And all promenade - sing
Because, Just Because.

Conclusion
The last time through each should have own partner, so for last three lines substitute:

Now you have your own
You promenade her home.
And thank her, that is all.

We think this is one of the best of the so called 'modern numbers '.  It is a catchy polka tune and the dancers love to help out the caller on the last line.

Many callers in the country arc associated with a certain tune and dance.  Whether they are the originators of that figure or tune is beside the point.  The fact remains that they are connected with it.  So it is with Duke Miller.  After this past summer he will always be thought of in connection with this dance and tune 'Just Because'.  It will make him famous.  And he will come to hate it, which is one of the prices of fame.  He was not the first to call it and he would be the first to tell you so.  But he does a beautiful job of calling it, as you will agree once you've danced with him.

I don't know whether the music is still in copyright, so I'm not giving it here.

Go halfway round        MacNamara's Band: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 2, No.4, October 1950.  Original wording on page 16    Internet Archive
As called by “Pop” Smith who uses the tune 'MacNamara's Band' for the figure.

Any introduction you wish:

The two head couples separate half way round the ring
The two side couples half right and left to the other side
All swing your partners, swing 'em round and round
Do si do your corners all, your corners do si do
Do si do your partners, your partners do si do
Swing your opposite ladies, swing 'em up & down
Take your corners where you are and promenade the town (to gent's place)

Repeat once more for the head couples.
Repeat twice more for the side couples
      or four times in all.

use any ending you wish.

Here's my understanding of the call.  A year later Ralph Page published his version which is very similar.

A1:Heads separate and go half-way round the outside.  Sides right and left through.
A2:All swing partner.  Do-si-do corner.
B1:Do-si-do- partner.  Gents cross over (I suggest like a right-hand star half-way but without hands) and quick swing with opposite lady.  [Gents are now home.]
B2:Promenade current corner all the way round, to the gent's home place.
 Ladies have moved right.  Repeat for the heads and then twice for the sides.

Birdie in the Cage        Reel des Moissonneurs: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 2, No.5, December 1950.  Original wording on page 16    Internet Archive
(Northern New England version)

Suggested music: “Reel des Moissionaires”

Here's exactly the way we call it.

Head two couples bow and swing
Right there at the head of the ring
Lead to the right and circle four
Once around and then no more
Lady in the cage, and act your age
Circle three hands once around
Girl steps out, gent steps in
Three hands round you go agin
Gent comes out, gives lady a swing
Up to the next and the same old thing
One with four, three with two
Four hands round that's what you do
Birdie in the cage, circle three
Bird flies out, crow hops in
Three hands round and gone agin
Crow comes out, gives birdie a swing
Home you go, every one swing oh
Swing your partner round in place
With a big smile on your face
Allemande left like sawin' pine
Right hand to partner, walk down the line
When you meet her, promenade eight
Promenade with sister Kate.
Then swing your partners, swing 'em all
Slim ones, fat ones, short or tall.

Side two couples bow and swing
Right there on both sides of the ring
Watch out there!  You'll break a toe
Lead to the right and round you go
Birdie in the cage three rails high
You be a preacher and so will I
Hen comes out, rooster hops in
Flap your wings and round agin
Rooster comes out, gives old hen a swing
On to the next and same old thing
Four with three, two with one
Circle four you're not quite done
Gent stays out, lady steps in
Don't forget to go round agin
Birdie comes out, old hawk's in
Join your hands and gone agin
Hawk comes out, gives birdie a swing
Home you go and swing your own
Ain't you lucky the bird ain't flown?
You swing yours, I'll swing mine
Rather swing my girl any old time
Allemande left like swingin' a birch
Grand right and left like catchin' perch
When you meet her, pass right by
Wink at the next as you go by
Kiss the last one on the sly
And swing your partner by and by
Swing ' em men, swing ' em all
They ain't done that since way last fall
Promenade all around the hall
Kiss her quick or not at all.

Tony Parkes says:

The tune Ralph had in mind for Birdie in the Cage was undoubtedly Reel des Moissonneurs (Harvesters' Reel).  It appeared under that name on a French-Canadian 78, one of several such discs that were welcomed by New England callers in the 1950s when it was hard to find decent danceable recordings that weren't too fast.  It's better known as “Irish-American Reel”.  Here's Dudley Laufman's old orchestra playing it: www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q7gpvyxRVVs

The version I'm giving comes from tunearch.org/wiki/Reel_des_moissonneurs_(1) and has the B music in the dominant, whereas Dudley's orchestra plays the whole tune in the same key.

“Bird in the cage” is a traditional Southern figure from what we in England call Running Set — see round.soc.srcf.net/dances/krs/guts.  Ralph gives a different version of the dance — Birdie Fly Away — in Volume 2 number 12.

Solomon Levi        Solomon Levi: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 2, No.6, January 1951.  Original wording on page 16    Internet Archive
as called by Dick Best
Music: Solomon Levi

Verse:
The first lady and opposite gent
Lead out to the right
Circle three hands round you go
And hold her good and tight
Break those rings and then you form
Two lines upon the side
The two upon the head around
The outside now will slide.

Chorus:
Half way round and up the center
You meet her there and swing
The other six join hands around
And make a great big ring
A prettier girl, a nicer girl
A sweeter girl is she
Mow break that ring and swing your own
You swing your sweet Marie.

Verse:
The same head lady and opposite gent
Go forward to and fro (forward & back)
Forward again and pass right through
To the opposite side you go
The two ladies chassez the center (across)
The gents promenade (gents promenade across)
The two gents chassez the center (to place)
The ladies promenade (to place)

Chorus:
The same four holding the floor
Swing your partners in place
You've got no money, you've got your honey
So give her a good embrace
Right and left with your right hand couple
And right and left right back
Now right hand to your partners all
A grand chain round the track (grand r & l)

Repeat changes for each couple in turn.

Dick Best is one of the many good young callers working out of Greater Boston.  He calls regularly every Thursday night at the YWCA in Cambridge.  He is an excellent singer of folk songs too and has delighted New England Folk Festival audiences for many years.

This is a singing call which explains itself.  We think it is one of [his] finest calls.

I'm afraid doesn't explain itself to me!  First off, I have great difficulty setting the words to my version of the tune — maybe there's a very different version of the tune but I haven't found one, and surely in all versions the chorus will start “Oh, Solomon Levi” (or a similar phrase) which doesn't scan with “Half way round and up the center” or “The same four holding the floor”.  See for instance the MudCat discussion at mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=163862.  The words fit much better if you just play the verse (the first 16 bars) repeatedly and ignore the chorus — but surely the chorus is the best-known part of the tune.

“First lady and opposite gent” comes from the quadrille (and you see this in “Honest John Part Two”), but normally they would dance a figure with each other, whereas here they're working independently.  Here's my understanding of the dance.  I've added lines forward and back because I can't see how else to pad out the music — if you have any other ideas please Contact me.  The second verse starts like the second figure of The Plain Quadrille: first lady and opposite gent forward and back, and cross over.  But the quadrille continues with them crossing back to home place, whereas this has chassées and promenades.  That strikes me as similar to a move in “La Russe” where the first couple promenade through the third couple while the third couple cross the set outside them and then the reverse.  However in this dance it's the gents promenading through the ladies while the ladies cross the set outside them and then reversing it with the ladies promenading and the men crossing outside them.  And then the second half adds “(to place)” which doesn't make sense.  It never occurred to me that I would have the same problems interpreting dances from these books that I've met in my Interpretations of dances from the 17th and 18th centuries!  I'm going to ignore “to place” and tell the actives to get back to their partners for the swing (which lasts 8 bars, so it's not a rush).  Perhaps the line “Swing your partners in place” means that the actives have first to get back to place, and Ralph added the erroneous “(to place)”.  Then a right and left through (and back) with the right-hand couple takes 8 bars — but there's no music left for the grand chain!  Maybe this is where the chorus of the song at last appears, and people would sing it as they danced.  Dick uses the older term “grand chain” and Ralph explains that this means “grand right and left”.  All the way round in 8 bars is very busy, but maybe it was understood that the chain is half-way followed by a promenade, so that's what I'm giving here.

A1:First lady and third gent move to their own right and circle with that side couple, breaking into lines with the actives on the end near their home position.
A2:Lines of three forward and back.  Lone dancers (first gent and third lady) go round the outside (clockwise?) half-way.
A3:Same two meet in the middle and swing while the other six circle left once around them.
A4:Finish the circle and all swing partner at home.
A5:First lady and third gent forward and back.  Cross over.
A6:Head gents lead across the set and then turn away from each other while head ladies cross the set outside their partners (but inside the set, not outside the side couples) and turn in.  Ladies then lead through the gents and turn out while gents cross the set outside their partners and turn in.
A7:First lady and third gent cross back to their partners, and head couples swing.
A8:Head couples right and left through with the side couple on their right, and back again.
B:(first 8 bars only): Grand chain half-way.  Promenade partner home.
 Repeat with second lady and opposite man, then third, then fourth.

Tony Parkes says:

First, I agree that the call doesn't explain itself, and I sympathize with your attempts to interpret mid-20th-century dances.  I can often discern the author's intention where a less experienced reader couldn't, but this one gives me pause.

As to the arrangement of the tune, I feel certain that Dick Best intended it to be played AABA, AABA, AA.  (Around 1950, when live music was still the norm everywhere, many callers prescribed peculiar sequences of verse and chorus music for some of their singing calls.)  The grand chain is prompted, to be danced (all the way round) to the extra “AA” music.  I realize that the words in the first half of each “chorus” don't scan well to the “Oh, Solomon Levi” music, but I have many, many singing-call records from that era on which the caller sings the melody as best he can while the note values of the lyrics differ widely from the original song.  I could do this one easily.

But I'm having as much trouble as you did in interpreting the figure.  I agree that either Dick or Ralph (or both) appears to have forgotten that two people are across from home in the middle of the second verse.  I wish I had another source for this call — often there will be clarifying text in a different book — but I've never seen it anywhere else.

Wearin' o' the green        Wearin' o' the green: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 2, No.7, March 1951.  Original wording on page 22    Internet Archive
called by Corky Calkins of Northampton, Mass.
A singing call to same music

Oh Paddy dear, do you hear?
You lead up to the right,
Balance to that lady there
And swing her nice and light.
Then it's up to the next you go.
And do a three hand swing.
Return now to your partner
And salute the dear old thing,
Allemande left with your corners all
And a right hand to your own,
A grand right and left you go,
Until you meet your own.
You swing her when you meet her,
You swing her nice and light,
Or there'll be trouble brewin' sure
When Pat gets home tonight.

      (You are now across the set from original position. Stay there and continue with --)

Now Maggie dear, do you hear?
You lead up to the right,
Swing the mick who's standing there
And hug him nice and tight.
Then it's up to the next you go,
And do a three hand swing,
Return now to your partner,
And salute the dear old thing.
Allemande left your corners all,
And a right hand to your own.
A grand right and left you go.
Until you meet your own.
You swing her when you meet her,
Swing around in place,
Swing your Irish colleen
With a smile upon your lace.

(Repeat calls for second couple, THEN)

Now all four ladies join left hands
And circle half way round,
Right hand to your opposite
And balance four in line.
Swing your opposite all around,
Is the order of the day,
But now that you have swung him
You go back the other way.
All four ladies join right hands
And circle half way home.
Left hand to your partner
And balance four in line,
Swing your partners, swing your own,
By the waning of the moon,
The next gent must be ready to dance
When I begin the tune.

(Go back to beginning for 3rd & 4th couples)

The whole of this issue is “Irish” — for instance the contra is “St. Patrick's Day in the morning”.  St. Patrick's Day is March 17th and there's a picture of a leprechaun holding a card with this date at the end of the dance instructions.  It's much celebrated in the States (though hardly at all in England)..

The tune is in the classic collection “O'Neill's Music of Ireland” (1905).

Wearing of the Green

Here's my understanding of the call.

 Figure:
A1:First gent out to your right-hand lady (4 steps); balance to her.  Swing.
A2:First gent move on to the next couple (the threes), circle left once around, then go home and bow to your partner.
B:(16 bars): All allemande left corner and grand chain half-way round.
 Swing partner (all opposite home place).
 For the next time through the tune the first lady goes out to her right-hand man and does exactly the same, all ending home.
 Repeat figure for the second couple.
 Break:
A1:Four ladies form a left-hand star (4 steps); star half-way, keep hold and give right hand to opposite man's right to form two interlocking waves of four.  Balance right and left twice.
A2:Swing opposite.
B:Four ladies form a right-hand star; star half-way, give right hand to partner.  Balance right and left twice.
 Swing partner.
 Repeat figure for third and fourth couples, and finish with the break.

The timing is probably not as precise as that!  In some singing squares the call comes as the dancers are supposed to move, rather than prompting them ahead of time, so unless they already knew this dance there would be a pause before the ladies were ready to do their stars.

I'm assuming “And do a three hand swing” means circle left, because the very next dance contains “And swing four hands so dandy (circle four)”.

Tony Parkes says:

Lawrence Loy recorded a very similar version of this dance for RCA Victor in 1945: youtube.com/watch?v=F2XwrefqdWg

Where Calkins says “three-hand swing,” Loy says “three-hand ring,” so you're correct in thinking a circle is called for here.

I see that Ralph wrote “Calky Calkins” in longhand, but the caller's actual nickname was “Corky.”

I'm not impressed by Lawrence Loy, who doesn't sing at all — he just says the words to the rhythm of the music — but at least you can hear how the call fits the tune.  He calls it with both head gents leading the figure simultaneously and so on, which makes for more action all round.  He has the gents doing the stars (right, then left) rather than the ladies.

Yankee Doodle        Yankee Doodle: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 2, No.8, April 1951.  Original wording on page 18    Internet Archive
YANKEE DOODLE---A Singing Quadrille
as called by Edgar Robillard, N. Adams, Mass.

Music - The Same

Introduction:

Salute your corners, partners the same
And circle eight hands so dandy
Circle left around the hall
With your Yankee Doodle Dandy
The other way back
On the same old track
The other way back so dandy
Mind the music and the step
And with the girls be handy.

The Dance:

The first head couple lead to the right
And swing four hands so dandy (circle four)
You balance too, and pass right through
And swing your opposite dandy.
Pass right back in the same old track
Pass right back so dandy
Pass right back in the same old track
And swing your partner dandy.
Then it's up to the next you go
And swing four hands so dandy
You pass right through with a how-de-do
And swing your opposite dandy.
Pass right back in the same old track
Pass right back so dandy
Pass right through and spin her too
You swing your partner dandy.
And It's up to the last you go
And swing four hands so dandy
You balance too, and pass right through
And swing your opposite dandy.
Pass right back in the same old track
Pass right back so dandy
Pass right back in the same old track
And swing your partner dandy.

Chorus:

Now do si do your corners all
The same unto your dandy
Allemande left your corners all
Give right hands to your dandy.
Go right and left around the hall
Right and left so dandy
Go all the way, go all the way
Go all the way so dandy.
You pass your honey with a nice little smile
You'll meet her bye and bye
Turn her around when you meet her there
Then promenade your dandy.
Promenade round, you promenade round
You promenade so dandy
Go all the way, go all the way
Go all the way so dandy.

Repeat the figure and chorus for each of the other three couples.

I've given the tune without repeats, so that once through the tune fits the Introduction.  I'm being pedantic about the timing of the Introduction but you certainly wouldn't want to teach it that way.  In fact it's better if you don't walk through the Introduction at all — just start the singing and it will all flow naturally.  I've already quoted Tony Parkes as saying that walkthroughs were much more common than they would become a decade later, but maybe you would leave out walking through the Introduction and just walk through the figure.  The timing of the figure may not be exact either, but it's certainly busy, so don't let anyone swing for more than a couple of seconds!

 Introduction:
A:Honour corner and partner (4 bars).  Circle left (half-way).
B:Circle left a quarter more, then circle right home.
 The Dance:
A:First couple out to the couple on your right and circle left with them.  Balance; pass through and turn back.
B:Quick swing with opposite (just once around, to face partner); pass through and turn back.  Quick swing with partner.
 First couple repeat this with the threes, then with the fours, finishing home.
 Chorus:
A:All do-si-do corner.  Do-si-do partner.
B:Allemande left corner; start a grand chain all the way round.
A:Continue the grand chain until home, then give right hands and gent twirl the lady into New England promenade position.
B:Promenade all the way.
 Repeat the figure and chorus for each of the other three couples.  

Go Half-way Round        Buffalo Gals: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 2, No.9, May 1951.  Original wording on page 17    Internet Archive
Music - Anything you like, though we prefer to use Buffalo Gal.

Any introduction, then:

Head two couples separate
Go halfway round outside the ring
Side two couples half right and left
All stay on the opposite side
Allemande left with the corners there
Do si do your own right there
The four men go across the ring
Give the opposite girl a swing
Take your corner from where you are
And promenade round the ring.

Head two couples separate
Go half way round outside the ring
Side two couples half right and left
And you're all on the opposite side
Allemande left with the corners there
Do si do your own right there
The four men go across the ring
To give the opposite girl a swing
Take the corner lady there
And promenade round the ring

Repeat twice for side couples. Or if you like a longer dance have head couples start the figure four times. Then a brief chorus figure; then four times with side couples starting. This is a nice “breakdown” figure; everyone dances most all the time.  It's sort of a screwy way to get to promenade your corner but nevertheless it's a lot of fun to dance.

This is much the same as “Pop” Smith's version above

The Ladies Switcheroo        Cec McEachern's Breakdown: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 2, No.10, September 1951.  Original wording on page 19    Internet Archive
(An original call by Ted Sannella)

Music - McEachern' s Breakdown

The Dance

The head two couples forward and back
The side two couples forward and back
The head two ladies chain to the right just half way round
Now ladies grand chain through the center of town (half way)
The head two couples right and left two by two (half way)
The side two couples right and left too (half way)
Do-si-do your corners all
Come back and. swing your own little doll.

The new head ladies chain to the right, now chain them just halfway
Now grand chain them through the center, don't you take all day
The head two couples half right and left, just like you did before
The side two couples do the same, keep moving 'cross the floor
Allemande left your corners
Allemande right your own
Swing your corner lady, promenade her home.

(repeat entire dance 3 more times)

The tune, Cec McEachern's Breakdown, was published in 1950 in a Canadian book called “Don Messer's Favorite Melodies”.  And this time I'm confident I've understood the call.

According to Wikipedia, “A switcheroo is a sudden unexpected variation or reversal, often for a humorous purpose.  It is colloquially used in reference to an act of intentionally or unintentionally swapping two objects.”  In this case the ladies are switching position all the time, while the men just move across to the other side and back again.

A1:Heads forward and back.  Sides forward and back.
A2:Heads to the right: ladies chain.  All four ladies chain across.
B1:Heads right and left through.  Sides right and left through.
B2:All do-si-do corner.  Swing partner.
A3:Heads to the right: ladies chain.  All four ladies chain across (to original partner).
A4:Heads right and left through.  Sides right and left through (all home).
B3:All allemande left corner, allemande right partner, swing corner.
B4:Promenade new partner to the man's place.
 Ladies have moved right.  Repeat for the heads, then twice for the sides, and I'm sure Ted would have put in a break at the beginning, middle and end, making it11 times through the tune .

Corners of the Hall        White Cockade: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 2, No.11, October 1951.  Original wording on page 22    Internet Archive
As called by Dick Castner.

Music - Any tune you like.  Dick likes The White Cockade.  We prefer The Low Backed Car.

First couple promenade around the outside of the ring
And right and left through with the couple you meet (2nd couple)
Right and left through on the corners complete (3rd with 4th)
Everyone right and left back on the same old track
Ladies chain on the corners of the hall (1 with 2; 3 with 4)
Half promenade on the corners of the hall
Half right and left back home
Circle four on the sides of the floor (1 with 2; 3 with 4)
Break that circle out into line, forward all and back
Forward again and ladies chain the grand square
When you're home you swing your own.

     Each couple leads out in turn.

This is a combination of at least two popular quadrille numbers, and is a great favorite among our French-Canadian dancers.  Sometimes it is called “Corners of the World.”  No matter what you call, it remains a fine New England style quadrille.

Again the word “quadrille” to remind us of its origins.  The first half comes from the first figure of The Plain Quadrille but with couples working in pairs rather than two couples dancing the figure while the other two wait for their turn.  I don't know where the second half comes from, but that's down to my lack of knowledge of quadrilles.

A1:First couple promenade outside, all the way.
A2:Ones with twos, threes with fours, right and left through, and back.
B1:Same four, ladies chain over and back.
B2:Same four half promenade.  Right and left through back again.
A3:Same four circle left once around, opening up into lines with heads on the right-hand end (nearest home position).  Lines forward and back.
A4:Ladies chain across the set, and wheel round to face up and down.  Ladies chain up and down, and wheel round to face across.
B3:All that again.
B4:Swing partner at home.
 Repeat for each couple in turn.

Birdie Fly Away        Print this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 2, No.12, November 1951.  Original wording on page 21    Internet Archive
Music - Any tune that you like to call to.

The first couple lead out to the right
And circle four and hold on tight
Lady in the middle and you circle three
Lady steps out, gent steps in
Join hands and circle again
Gent comes out and gives lady a swing
And you both lead on in a bigger ring
Circle six with the next
Birdie in the middle and you circle five
No mistakes now, look alive
Birdie hops out, old crow in
Join hands go round again
Crow comes out, gives birdie a swing
Then you all lead on in a great big ring
Circle eight hands around
Birdie in the middle and you circle seven
That's one way to go to heaven
Keep circlin' left, but raise your hands
Let the birdie in the middle fly away
You won't see her again today
Everybody swing and promenade hone

Repeat three more times for the other ''birdies''

It's equally as much fun to let the “old crows” fly away instead of the “birdies”.

The dance as given here is a combination of a figure we saw at Stockton Folk Dance Camp and one that Al Smith, Winchester, Mass, used to call.

Another version of “Birdie in the Cage”, this time cumulative, so after swinging his partner the leading gent picks up the next couple with his left hand to form a bigger circle.  You can see that Ralph is no purist: he combined figures from two places to create this dance.



Volume 3

When the bloom is on the sage        Print this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 3, No.1, December 1951.  Original wording on page 14    Internet Archive
As called by Dick Best

First couple separate around the outside ring (all the way)
Same couple allemande left and swing in the center
Gent to the left, lady to the right
Each one:
     allemande left with the lady
     allemande right with the gent
     allemande left with the lady again
     and they swing in the center
Now the lady to the left, gent to the right
Each one:
     allemande left with the lady
     allemande right with the gent
     allemande left with the lady again
     and swing in the center
Do si do your corners all
Swing your partners one and all

Second, third, and fourth couples do the same changes in turn.

Use any introduction and any ending that you wish.

Old Fall River Line        On the Old Fall River Line: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 3, No.2, February 1952.  Original wording on page 17    Internet Archive
The archived copies are incomplete, with the pages in a strange order, and the dance isn't there, but Ralph reprinted it in Volume 8 Number 7.

Contra Square        Stumpey: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 23-Jan-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 3, No.3, March 1952.  Original wording on page 22    Internet Archive
An original call by Ted Sannella

Any music - though Ted prefers Reel of Stumpey

Head couples balance and do-si-do
Allemande left with your corners, oh
Hold on by the left, give right to your own and balance four in line (Only heads give right hand to partner thereby forming two lines at the head positions)
Now forward all and back.
Swing at the head and swing at the foot (First and third couples only swing)
Now go through the center with your own (First couple go down the hall while the third couple goes up the hall, passing each other in center of set as in right and left)
Turn right around, come the same way home.  (The two couples turn individually and return back through the center to home position)
Cast off with your corners and the ladies chain across, and back  (Cast off into contra formation with two lines facing each other from the side positions in the square.  Opposite ladies chain)
Join your hands and forward all and back
The center four go forward again and circle left (The original head two couples from positions in the center of each line step forward and join hands circling to the left until back nearest home positions - original home)
Turn your opposite lady with right hand around and now your own with left hand around.  (Head couples only do this)
Everybody turn your corner with a right hand around
All go home and swing with your own
Promenade around the square
Take a little walk with your lady fair.

Repeat entire dance for side couples.  Remember that this time the contra formation is formed by two lines in the head positions.

Ted first called this figure at one of the evening parties at New Hampshire Folk Dance Camp.  It was a sensation there.
Here's how I would phrase it to the music:

A1:Head couples balance forward and back, do-si-do partner, allemande left corner, keep hold, heads give right to partner forming two waves across the hall.
A2:Balance forward and back; heads swing (6 bars).
B1:Heads pass through and turn alone.  Pass through back again, their corners face the same way as the heads and with a hand hold or arm round the waist wheel the heads round into side lines with the heads in the middle.
B2:In fours, ladies chain over and back.
A3:Lines forward and back.  Middles (heads) circle left ¾ and fall back to home place.
A4:Heads with your opposite, right-hand turn.  With partner left-hand turn.
B3:All with corner, right-hand turn.  Swing partner.
B4:Promenade all the way round the square.

Red River Valley        Red River Valley: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 23-Jan-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 3, No.4, May1952.  Original wording on page 17    Internet Archive
as recalled by Roger Knox from the calling of Floyd Woodhull.

First couple through the second and you balance.  (1st gent is now standing back to back with 2nd lady; 1st lady is standing back to back with 2nd gent)
Go round to the center and you swing (1st couple pass right shoulders, gent coming into the center behind the 2nd gent; 1st lady goes behind and around 2nd lady)
Right and left four down the valley
Right and left four back to place.
Now you go through the next and you balance.
Go round to the center and you swing
Now you right and left four down the valley
Right and left four back to place.
Now you go through the last and you balance.
Go round to the center and you swing
Right and left four down the valley
Then you right and left back to place.

A singing call to a rather monotonous 16-bar tune.

A1:First couple lead out to the right and pass the opposite person right shoulder to finish facing out with their backs to the twos (a mere 4 steps); balance facing out.  Cross right shoulder and go around one to finish back in the centre; quick swing (probably just half-way to get the gent back on the left).
B1:Right and left through with the twos, and back, to finish facing the threes.
A2/B2:Same with threes.
A3/B3:Same with fours.
 Repeat for each couple in turn.

The A part is mighty quick!  And as in Girl I Left Behind Me the balance is to nobody, facing out.

Around Just One        Print this danceTop of page   Added 23-Jan-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 3, No.5, June1952.  Original wording on page 18    Internet Archive
as called by Dick Castner

Music - whatever you like

The Figure

First couple down the center and split the ring, around just one (thus facing the caller, Man 1, Lady 3, Man 3, Lady 1)
Forward four and four fall back
Forward again to the head of the set
Divide in the center and around just one by couples (thus, first man and third lady as a couple - she on his left - go around the fourth lady and stand between her and her partner - fourth gent - so, on the caller's left will be a line - L4, M1, L3, M4, and on caller's right a line - M2, Ll, M3, L2)
Forward all and all fall back
Canter four forward four, pass right through, separate and around just one to place.

From here, you may do as you wish.  The head couples are coming at each other, and are in an ideal position for a do si do; or an allemande left around partners, allemande right around corners; you may have them allemande left with partners and do si do corners.  Or you may have a long version by having break end with a promenade corners.  With good dancers, you may have the head two couples start using a “pass right through, and around just one”, and forward immediately at the sides.

A good clear explanation, though it's interesting that having got people home again (not that the sides have gone anywhere much) he leaves the end of the figure as an “exercise for the student”.  But what does he mean by “break end with a promenade corners”?  My understanding of a break is that it ends where it started, with the same partner.  And this is a figure which each couple in turn leads, so you couldn't change partners part-way through the sequence.

Here's how I'd phrase it to the music, with my chosen ending:

A1:First couple lead across the set, split the third couple, separate, go around just one to a line of four facing the caller.  Lead forward four steps and fall back.
A2:Forward again until you're past the side couples, then middles let go and as (improper) couples wheel around just one side person (rapidly), to finish between that couple in facing lines of four.  Lines forward and back.
B1:Middle four (heads) pass through, separate, go around just one to meet partner in home place.  Heads do-si-do partner.
B2:All allemande left corner and swing partner.

And here's my version for “good dancers”.  He hasn't pointed out that with both head couples leading the figure you don't get to the same lines of four.  Maybe that's another “exercise for the student”.  And if the heads lead the figure and then the sides that's only twice through, so I'll go for the long version with the “promenade corners” option.

A1:Head couples pass through, separate, around just one to facing lines of four.  Lines forward and back.
A2:Heads right and left through.  Pass through, go around just one to home place.
B1:Heads do-si-do partner.  Swing corner.
B2:Promenade to the man's place.
 Repeat figure for the heads, then twice for the sides, with breaks at the beginning, middle and end.

So you tell me: Have I just filled in a missing blank, or have I just written a new dance?

Loomis Lancers, figures 1-3        Print this danceTop of page   Added 23-Jan-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 3, No.6, June 1952.  Original wording on page 20    Internet Archive
As danced by the OLD TIMERS CLUB of Swansea, Massachusetts.

Copies of the music - which is fully covered by copyright and therefore omitted here - and full directions for the dance may be obtained from the secretary of the Old Colony Callers & Teachers Association.  Price $1.00 per set.  Order from Ruth V. Metcalf, 53 Chestnut St. Sharon, Mas

The Dance as taught by Jack Kenyon

Figure 1

Play music 4 times

1.  Honor partners. honor corners (Called once)
2.  First four forward and back
3.  Cross over taking side ladies
4.  Forward and back six
5.  Turn your partners
6.  Chassez by corners
7.  Turn corners

Repeat with the sides; then repeat all.

Explanation

l.  Bow to partners
2.  Active couples (1 & 3) move forward to center and backward to places
3.  Same two couples move forward again and, each keeping to right of center, cross square, turning to back into opposite couple's vacated position.  As couples back into place, each active gent takes right hand of his original right hand lady in his left hand and takes her also along with him to opposite position. This will leave side gents in position, alone .
4.  Active gents, each with two ladies, move forward to center and backward to place
5.  All turn original partners with right hand turn, (or swing partners, waist swing)
6.  All chassez, or walk past corners and back to position 4 steps or slides each way.  Do not turn.  If you use the walk, walk forward past corner and walk backward to place.  If you use
the chassez step, there is a short pause before sliding in reverse direction to own place.  Gent passes in back of ladies.
7.  All turn corners with a left hand turn (or swing corners, waist swing).

Figure 2

Play music 4 times

A. 1. Join hands, forward and back
     2. Turn the ladies to the center (back to back)
     3. Turn the gents to the center (back to back)
     4. Ladies give right hands across
     5. Promenade with your partner
     6. Turn your corners

B. 1. Join hands, forward and back
     2. Turn the gents to the center
     3. Turn the ladies to the center
     4. Gentlemen give left hands across
     5. Promenade with your partner
     6. Turn your partners

Repeat A and B once more each

Explanation

A. 1. All join hands and walk into the center and back
   2. Gentlemen join inside hands with partners and turn ladies to the center, facing the gentlemen.  Retain hand clasp, and each bow to partner.  Still holding hands, gents turn partners to position in set.
   3. With the same hand clasp and in exactly the same manner, the ladies turn the gentlemen to the center back to back, and return them to position in set.
   4. All four ladies join hands in a right hand star, link opposite arms with partners --- (Lady's left and gent's right.)
   5. All promenade clockwise in star formation once around
   6. All turn corners as in Figure 1

B.l. As A.l
   2. Same as A. 2, except where word “gentlemen” is used, substitute “ladies” and where “ladies” is used, substitute “gentlemen”.
   3. Same as A. 3, making same substitutions of words as above
   4. All 4 gents join hands in left hand star, link opposite arms with partners (Gents R, ladies L)
   5. All promenade counterclockwise in star formation once around
   6. All turn partners as in Figure 1

Figure 3

Play music 4 times
Wait for music

1.  Join hands, forward and back
2.  Three steps to the right - salute
3.  Four ladies chain
4.  Join hands, forward and back
5.  Three steps to the right - salute
6.  Four gentlemen chain
Repeat all of above calls

Explanation

1.  All join hands, into center and back.  Keep hands joined and make as nearly true circle as possible when again in place
2.  Still holding hands, starting on right foot, each walks to right three steps (right, left right), ladies turn to face partners and curtsey.  At same time gentlemen bow to partners.  Do not loose hand holds.  Without further call, after salute, entire circle returns to position in readiness for next call
3.  Four ladies grand chain across the square and return to partner
4.  Same as 1
5.  Same as 2
6.  Four gentlemen join hands in right hand star, go to opposite lady, break from star and link left elbows with opposite lady, who turns counterclockwise with him.  Gents leave opposite
lady and right hand star back to own partners, turning partners with left elbow to position.
Figure 4 (final figure) will be given next month.

Jack Kenyon, 36 Etta St, Hoxsie, Rhode Island has recorded the music for the LOOMIS LANCERS, and you may obtain the set for $4.50 by sending that amount to him at above address.  Please signify whether you want them with calls or without calls.  They'll be a worthwhile addition to your folk dance library.

I can't find the tune of this dance anywhere but I found an interesting quote (which I don't agree with at all) in History of Square Dancing pages 31-32:

The Lancers was the nineteenth-century equivalent of the minuet.  It was all bows and courtesies, airs and graces, an elegant exhibition of deportment.  There was nothing in it which could put the most delicate lady in the slightest glow.  Originally it had been an English dance, which went unvalued until the French toned it down and polished it up.  It set a style; there were many imitations, some of them quite successful; but the original Lancers outlived them all, except the “Loomis Lancers,” invented by the New Haven dancing-master, which is still done in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts.

My understanding of the instructions:

First of all, each of the figures is given as 6 moves (ignoring the honours before the first figure).  How does this relate to a 32-bar tune, which I would expect to have 4 or 8 moves?  In fact some of the tunes aren't 32 bars — see later.

In Figure 1 it doesn't say whether to take hands for the forward and back, but I assume so (and it seems obvious when we come to move 4).  The next move is a half promenade — though if I use this word people immediately want to take a promenade hold — wheeling as a couple at the end so that the men can take a side lady with their left hands.  In move 6 I imagine Ralph would prefer the chassez, as was done in the older quadrilles, but recognises that by the 1950's people expected to walk everything.  In move 7 he's underlined hand, presumably because Modern Western Square had switched to a forearm turn for an allemande left.  And it seems odd to finish the figure with your corner rather than your partner, but that's what he says.

This leaves the head couples in opposite places.  I assume you don't repeat the honours but continue with the sides leading forward and back, so that everyone is in opposite place.  Repeat all this to get everyone home.

In Figure 2 the timing is by no means obvious.  But on archive.org I found a copy of the book “Dance a while” which explains the timing fully.  It also goes into much more detail on the styling.  This copy is the fourth edition of 1994, but the first edition was published in 1950 which is two years before Ralph's publication, though I don't know whether this dance appeared in the first edition.  You can read this book at archive.org/details/dancewhilehandbo 0000harr_o0n7/page/66/mode/2up?view=theater — you need to create a (free) account and then you can “borrow” the virtual book for an hour at a time.  The dance instructions are preceded by the following section:

Style:  “The dancing of a lancer is an exercise in courtesy.”
  1. Address, honor, salute (your corner, your partner): These are all “bows.”  Variations are in the timing depending on the exact number of counts of music allowed.  “Address” usually takes 8 counts; “salute” may be momentary.  These bows may be done holding hands in a circle or with no hand holds.
    1. Bow (man's part); Slight bow: facing lady, man bends from waist, both feet together, offering right hand, palm up.  Left hand placed, palm up, at about the back left hip pocket, fingers extended; deep bow: facing lady, man steps back on left foot, bending left knee slightly, and extends right leg forward, pointing toe down; he offers his right hand, palm up.
    2. Curtsey (lady's part); slight bow: facing man, lady steps back on her right foot, bending right knee slightly, and extends left leg with toe pointed to floor.  She places fingers of her left hand lightly in man's upturned palm.  Her right arm is gracefully extended to side about waist high, palm down and fingers softly straight.  Keep head erect and smile; deep bow: facing man, lady crosses her right foot behind left, keeping torso erect, lowers her body deeply or sits on her foot.  Her left foot is extended in a point towards gentleman to match his.  Or lady may cross right foot behind left and, bending both knees, lower self to semikneeling position, sitting on right heel.  Free arm extended as above.
  2. Minuet position: Man extends right arm forward about waist high or to accommodate lady, bending elbow slightly and with palm down, fingers straight.  Lady places her left hand, palm down, lightly upon his, keeping her forearm close to his, with her right arm at side as in curtsey.  Arms are horizontal, partners side by side.  Hand hold may be reversed as in some parts of grand square; lady's right and man's left are joined.
  3. Pigeon-wing hand hold: Man and lady, facing each other, place their forearms, held vertically, close together, the palms held together, open and upright, elbows almost touching.
  4. Hands in general: Never let the hands be stiff.  Ladies, let the fingers hang softly, not like semaphores.  Let the wrists lead and the fingers follow.  Men, let the hand lie lightly on the hip pocket.  And let the hands be as long as possible.

These style notes come from the Lloyd Shaw Foundation, and I don't know whether Ralph would have agreed with them or not.

Figure 3 starts “Wait for music” which goes back to the old quadrilles: in the first figure you honoured partner and corner; in the other figures you just waited.  This time I don't have any trouble fitting the figure into 32 bars.  Notice that the men's chain is done with the right hand, rather than the left as is normal in the 21st century.  The version in “Dance a while” starts Introduction: Do-sa-do corners by the right shoulder (8 counts).  Do-sa-do partners by the left shoulder (8 counts). (done only once) and has no courtesy turns in the all four ladies/men chain — they just arrive, a quick nod and continue, so it's really just a star once around, although 16 counts are allocated to it so there certainly would be time for a courtesy turn.  I'm sticking with Ralph Page's version: his was written at the time, and no doubt he had a copy of the record with the dance as called by a man who knew it inside-out.

Figure 1 (jig)
 4 bars introduction — do nothing.
A1:Heads lead forward and back.  Keeping inside hands joined, half promenade across, and as you wheel into the opposite couple's place head men pick up the side lady on your left.
A2:Lines of three forward and back.  All right-hand turn partner or swing.
B:Either face centre and do four chassez steps to change places with (current) corner and back again (gents behind ladies) or walk forward passing corner right shoulder and fall back.  Left-hand turn corner or swing corner.
 Repeat the figure (without the initial honours) with side couples leading, so everyone finishes in opposite place.  Repeat with head couples and then side couples to end with everyone home.
Figure 2 (reel)
 2 bars introduction — do nothing.
A1:All join hands: 4 steps forward, 4 steps back.  Men keep inside hand with partner and wheel her in so the ladies are back to back in the centre, do a quick bow or curtsey on the 4th beat; men wheel partners backwards to place.
A2:Ladies wheel men in, bow or curtsey; wheel them out.  Keep hold of partner: ladies move forward to form a right-hand star and start a star promenade, spreading out as far as possible.
B:Continue the star promenade to place.  Left-hand turn corner.
 The second time the men are wheeled in first, they lead a left-hand star promenade, and it finishes with right-hand turn partner.  Repeat the whole thing.
Figure 3 (jig)
 8 bars introduction — do nothing.
A1:All join hands: 4 steps in to the middle and back.  Circle right for three steps (R, L, R) and bow or curtsey to partner (retaining hands); circle left three steps.  [“Dance a while” says there is a held note on the bow.]
A2:All four ladies chain across, with (I'm guessing) an open left-hand turn rather than a courtesy turn.  Chain back.
B1:Same as A1.
B2:All four gents chain across: right-hand star half-way and left elbow turn opposite lady.  Chain back.
 The instructions in “Dance a while” say you now repeat all this (except for the introduction).

Loomis Lancers, final figure        Print this danceTop of page   Added 23-Jan-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 3, No.7, September 1952.  Original wording on page 31    Internet Archive
As danced by the OLD TIMERS CLUB of Swansea, Massachusetts.

Copies of the music - which is fully covered by copyright and therefore omitted here - and full directions for the dance may be obtained from the secretary of the Old Colony Callers & Teachers Association.  Price $1.00 per set.  Order from Ruth V. Metcalf, 35 Chestnut St, Sharon, Mass.

The Dance as taught by Jack Kenyon continued from Vol 3, No. 6.

Figure 4


Before music starts, call ''Grand Square, Address partners'' .  (Orchestra gives D7th chord.)

A. 1. Heads forward, sides separate
     2. First couple promenade inside 2c face out
     3. Side couples fall in line (or fill in)
     4. Chassez
     5. Cross corners
     6. Join hands, forward and back
     7. Forward and turn partner in place

B. 1. Sides forward, heads separate
     2. Second couple promenade Inside & face out
     3. Head couples fall in
     4. Chassez
     5. Cross comers
     6. Join hands, forward and back
     7. Forward and turn partner in place

C. Same as A, but in call 2, third couple will promenade inside and face out.

All. other calls the same.

D. Same as B, but in call 2, fourth couple will promenade inside and face out.

All other calls the same.

Explanation


Call “Grand Square” is given only once, at beginning of figure.

A.  1. When trying this for the first time, practice first with the head couples, then with the sides, and then together.

     a.  Head couples (1 and 3) walk forward four steps to center of set while side couples (2 & 4) face partners and walk backward four steps to corner of set.

     b. Head couples face partners and walk backward four steps (away from partner) to sides of set while side couples face opposite corner & walk to head of set.

     c. Head couples face opposites and walk backward four steps to corner of set while the side couples face own partner and walk forward to center of set.

     d. Head couples face partners and walk forward four steps to home position as side couples face opposite and walk backward to home position.

Without further calls, immediately reverse the above four sections – heads following directions given for sides, and sides following directions given for heads – until everyone is back in home position ready for next call.

Note.  The “Grand Square” is a figure in which each person in the set individually walk a square within the set, from his home position, then immediately retraces his route back to home position again; all this according to call for his or her position in set.

     2.  First couple walk around inside of the set, counterclockwise, and face out.

     3.  Couple 2 fall in behind 1, 4 behind 2, 3 behind 4 (Third couple merely hold position.)

This forms a line of couples.  Ladies step one step ahead of partners, staying to partners right.

     4, Using slide step, ladies slide three steps to their left, gents slide three steps to own right.  Without further call, chassez back to position, ladies now coming into position beside partners, on partner's right.  (Gents go behind ladies on slide out and back.)  Without call, all turn to face partners, stopping two steps away from each other.

     5.  Gents 1 and 2 join inside hands; at same time gents 3 and 4 join inside hands.  Ladies 1 and 2 take skater's position (crossed hands) as do ladies 3 and 4.  Each two with joined hands now turn to face opposite comer.  Gents 1 and 2 together facing ladies 3 and 4; gents 3 and 4 facing ladies 1 and 2.  (Dancers do this without calls.)  Ladies 3 and 4 and gents 1 and 2 advance to opposite corner of set, ladies going under raised, joined hands of gents.  Each two turn toward each other, ready to recross set in same manner as they crossed.  When gents 1 and 2 and ladies 3 and 4 reach opposite corner and begin turn for recross, gents 3 and 4 & ladies 1 and 2 cross set as other couples did.

Gents 1 and 2 and ladies 3 and 4 recross set back to place; immediately afterward, gents 3 and 4 and ladies 1 and 2 recross to place.

     6.  Immediately after all couples have completed cross-over, reform lines, gents on one side, ladies on other side facing partners, about four steps apart.  Gents join hands; and la dies join hands in their own lines.  Two lines advance toward each other and go back to position.

     7. All now resume proper position in set & all turn partners, using either two hand turn or waist swing.  (A long swing is called for by the phrasing of the music.)

B. 1. Same as A. 1. except substitute “sides” for “heads”; “heads” for “sides”.

     2. Same as A. 2. except substitute “second couple” for “first couple”.

     3. Couple 1 fall in behind 2; couple 3 behind 1, couple 4 hold position.

     4,5,5,7, same as in A.

C. 1. Same as A. 1.

     2. Same as A. 2. except substitute “third couple” for “first couple”.

     3. Couple 4 fall in behind 3, couple 2 behind 4, couple 1 hold position.

     4,5,5,7, Same as in A.

D. 1. Same as B.l.

     2. Same as B.2 explanation, except substitute “fourth couple” for “second couple”.

     3. Couple 3 fall in behind couple 4, couple 1 behind 3, couple 2 hold position.

     4,5,5,7. Same as in A.

And there you have the famous “Loomis Lancers”.  You may obtain records of the music either with or without calls by writing to Jack Kenyon,36 Etta St, Hoxsie, Rhode Island, and enclose $4,50 for the set.  Be sure you tell him whether you want the records with calls or without.

Apparently the “Loomis Lancers” was one of the last of the Lancers, for it incorporates a waist swing which earlier figures of the Lancers omit.  I have seen the group dance it using a right hand swing occasionally.  The dance deserves far wider recognition and we are glad to publish it (with permission) in the NORTHERN JUNKET, with that in mind.

Jack Kenyon has led a group demonstrating it at several of the New England Folk Festivals, and it always is a pronounced hit.  Jack tells us that it is the first dance after intermission at all meetings of the Old Timers Club, in Swansea, Mass., which is one of the oldest dance clubs in the East, perhaps the country, for they have been organised over 50 years.

Here's my understanding of the fourth figure.

This time there are 7 moves rather than 8, but again “Dance a while” comes to the rescue.

Ralph gives a beautifully clear description of a Grand Square and reverse, and I assume him saying that the call is given only once means that the caller doesn't break the figure down or even say “reverse”.  It's a 16-bar figure, and possibly not well-known in those days since Ralph gives advice on how to teach it.  This is move 1, starting Heads forward, sides separate.

After the chassez, we finish in a square on the diagonal, two gents together, two ladies together.  Now comes a move reminiscent of the doubled-up arching figure in La Russe which is now a traditional English dance but was originally a quadrille.  The doubled-up arching also occurs in Goathland Square Eight.  In Loomis Lancers it's always the gents arching and the ladies going under; perhaps the ladies are told to use a skaters' hold because it keeps them closer together.

Figure 4 (reel)
 4 bars introduction: Do nothing.
A1:Sides face: Grand Square.
A2:Reverse.
B1:Ones wheel around to face out; twos and threes fall into a column, twos in front of threes.  All do four chassées to change places with partner, gents behind ladies; four back again and instantly middles take inside hand with end neighbour and wheel 45° (middles going backwards) to a diamond formation.  The top two gents are facing diagonally across to the bottom two ladies and vice-versa.
B2:Men make single-handed arches and ladies take promenade position: top men arch and cross with bottom ladies (then men change hands as ladies turn in without changing hands); bottom men and top ladies the same.  Repeat to place and face partner.
C1:Lines of four go forward and back.  All two-hand turn partner to original place in the square.
C2:Left-hand turn corner.  Right-hand turn partner.
 Second time through it's “Heads face, grand square”.  According to both Ralph Page and “Dance a while” The ones fall in above the threes to form the column, which seems inconsistent to me.  The top of the set is now on the caller's right, so it will again be first and second gent arching first.  And maybe that's why the order is inconsistent — if all four times through you start the diagonal move with “First and second gent arch, third and fourth ladies under” you'll have a much better chance of finishing this rather fast figure with the music!  The dancers just need to remember that when they form the column it's always the ones and twos together, the threes and fours together.

Circle Three & Balance Four        Print this danceTop of page   Added 23-Jan-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 3, No.8, October 1952.  Original wording on page 24    Internet Archive
An original square by  Abe Kanegson

Head gents to the right and circle three
Head ladies do si do
Once and a half on the sides of the floor
*  Into the middle and balance four
Now balance four, four in line
Heads allemande left your own
A right hand round your corner
And you balance to your own
Then swing, your partners everyone
You swing your partners all
Now take the lady that you swung
And promenade the hall.

Repeat for the side gents

* Head gents pass through to the center of the set and join right hands with each other and left hands with partner.  Balance that way four in line.

Here's my understanding of the figure.  The circle 1½ leaves the sides improper so I've added a roll away to get them back.

A1:Head gents to the right and circle left 1½ with the side couple, opening out into side lines of three with the head gents in the middle while head ladies wait 8 beats and then do-si-do.  As they fall back, head gents move forward, join right hands with each other and left hands with partner to make a wave up and down the set.
A2:Balance the wave, heads allemande left partner while sides roll away (gent rolls lady from left to right), all allemande left corner.
B1:All balance and swing partner.
B2:Promenade.

Whirligig and Cheat (1)        Up Jumped The Devil: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 23-Jan-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 3, No.9, December 1952.  Original wording on page 24    Internet Archive
Ralph Page

Music - Whatever you like; maybe “Devils Dream”

The Dance

First lady out to the right and turn that man by the right hand around
Back to your partner by the left hand around
Turn the opposite gent by the right hand around
Back to your partner by the left hand around
The gent on the left by the right hand around
Back to your partner by the left hand around
And that lady cheat or swing - anywhere in the hall or the ring

Now two ladies out to the right etc.

Then three ladies out to the right etc.

And all four ladies out to the right etc.

Then all four men to the right of the ring etc.

Everybody balance your corners and everybody cheat or swing

Use any ending you wish to, though it is not necessary to have any.

After every cheat or swing call “go back home and swing your own; don't get  caught cheating your own”.

Golden Slippers        Golden Slippers: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 23-Jan-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 3, No.10, February 1953.  Original wording on page 21    Internet Archive
Suggested music: “Golden Slippers”

Use any introduction you can think of.

The Dance


The head two couples forward and back
Go forward again and pass right through
To the opposite side, but don't turn around
The girls go right and the men go left
Around the outside of the ring
Then by your corner you will stand
And you'll be four in line.
Now it's forward eight and back as you are
Side two couples make a right hand star
Go once around in the middle of the set
To allemande left your corners all
Then the two head couples a right hand star
Go once around the way you are
And with your corner swing.

Break


Swing your corner once or twice
Then a right hand to your own pretty wife
For a grand right and left the ring
Go hand over hand until you meet.
Then one and three turn back
Turn back and don't be slow
Do a right and left the other way you know
Now two and four you turn back
But keep on doing a right and left grand
All four couples turn back
Go right and left with the pretty little maids
When you meet your own you'll promenade
Until you all get home.

Repeat figure for side couples.

Ralph doesn't give the dance a title, just suggested music, and I don't believe it's a singing call.  You won't have much difficulty understanding the moves, but you may have trouble with Ralph's patter in which the figure has two lots of seven lines where the music obviously needs eight.  And there are other questions.  Does he mean that once the gent has swung his corner she becomes his new partner, referred to as his “own pretty wife” in the break?  And does Ralph do the break every time?  If not, the set will be on the skew after all swinging corners.  This is how I think the timing works — but I haven't tried it yet!

A1:Heads go forward and back.  Forward again and pass through.
A2:Separate and go round the outside until almost home, stopping to join hands with your corner on the end of side lines.  Lines forward and back.
B1:Middles (sides) right-hand star.  Allemande left corner 1½.
B2:New middles (heads) right-hand star.  Swing corner.
A3:(It's basically unphrased from here):  Right hand to new partner: grand chain half-way.  Heads meet and right-hand turn half-way to chain back in the opposite direction while the sides keep going (though they will need to wait until the heads are ready for them).
A4:Grand chain half-way.  Sides meet and right-hand turn half-way to chain back, heads keep going.
B3:Grand chain half-way.  All turn half-way.
B4:Chain in original direction.  Meet partner and promenade to the man's place.

Chain 'em Left and Right        Print this danceTop of page   Added 23-Jan-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 3, No.11, March 1953.  Original wording on page 20    Internet Archive
(An original square by Ted Sannella)

Suggested music: - whatever you like

The first couple balance, and then you swing
Go down the center and split the ring
Separate, go round to home
Do si do when you meet your own
Right and left four with the opposite two
And you right and left home
That's what you do.
First gent chain your lady to the left (first and fourth ladies chain halfway)
Take that new lady, chain her to the right (after a full turn around, 1st gent sends new partner into a ladies chain with 2nd lady)
Allemande left your corners all
Everybody swing the one you just left
Promenade around the square
Take a walk with that lady fair

Repeat for second, third, and fourth couples in turn and everybody should get their original partner back.

After the first turn the side ladies have changed places.  After the second turn the head ladies have also changed places.  The third and fourth turns get them home.

Wreck of the Number Nine        The Wreck of the Number Nine: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 23-Jan-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 3, No.12, April 1953.  Original wording on page 19    Internet Archive
Music - Wreck of the Number Nine

First couple lead to the right
Circle four hands around
Chassez by your partner
Salute your opposite lady
Chassez back, salute your own
Chassez by and swing your opposite lady
Chassez back and swing your own
Circle four hands half way round
Right and left six with the sides
Lead to the next, etc. except: Swing your own and lead to the next
Repeat figure with last couple, doing right and left six, etc.

Repeat for other couples in turn

Second and fourth couples of course doing right and left six with head couples.

I don't believe this one is phrased to the music.  The chassées come from the nineteenth century quadrilles and were originally done with a slip step.  In “Honest John” Ralph specifies four walk steps; in “Loomis Lancers” he gives both options.  Here's how I would call it.

First couple lead to the right to face the twos (with their backs to the centre).  Ones and twos circle left.
Chassez by your partner - four slip-steps or walk steps to change places, gents behind ladies.  Bow or curtsey to opposite.
Chassez back (again gents behind).  Bow or curtsey to partner.
Chassez by.  Swing opposite.  Chassez back. Swing partner.
Circle left half-way, so ones, twos and fours are in a column across the set.
“Right and Left Six”: Three couples in line move simultaneously, pass through (courtesy turn on ends) till ends are back home and ones are back in the middle.  I got this description from the book “Old Square Dances of America” by Neva Boyd and Tressie Dunlavy, 1925, but there the figure goes only half-way.
Ones finish in the middle facing the threes.  They repeat the figure but after swinging partner the ones finish facing the fours.
They repeat the figure, and at the end the ones fall back into their home place.

Repeat the figure with the other couples leading it.


Volume 4

Whirligig and Cheat (2)        Print this danceTop of page   Added 20-Feb-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 4, No.1, June 1953.  Original wording on page 21    Internet Archive
The Dance

Suggested music - any lively Breakdown

Introduction - Anything you like

First man out to the right of the ring
That right hand lady with your right hand swing
Then back to your own and the left hand around
To the opposite lady by the right hand around
Then back to your own and the left hand around
Your left hand lady with the right hand around
And back to your own by the left hand around
Then that one man cheat or swing
Anywhere in the hall or the ring
Then run back home and swing your own
Don't get caught a cheatin' your own.

Repeat entire figure with first and second men active

Repeat entire figure with first, second and third men active

Repeat entire dance with all men active

Repeat entire dance with all the ladies active.

The same as the earlier version except that the men lead the figure first.

Flower Girl Waltz Quadrille        Print this danceTop of page   Added 20-Feb-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 4, No.2, August 1953.  Original wording on page 24    Internet Archive

as called by Earl Gully at Maine Camp 1953

Music - Flower Girl Waltz

Gentlemen turn with the right hand around
Now turn your corner as you're homeward bound
Honor your partner, Rock to and fro
Honor your corner. Bowing so low
Waltz your corner. Waltz promenade
My pretty maid, waltz promenade
Waltz time. Waltz promenade
My pretty maid - back home

Repeat three more times til get original partner back again

About as simple as you can get.  It seems the music is actually several tunes arranged for a quadrille (which would have four or five figures).  I've found some conflicting versions on the web, and decided not to pursue my research any further!

Doodar        Camptown Races: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 20-Feb-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 4, No.3, October 1953.  Original wording on page 35    Internet Archive
An Old Time Singing Quadrille from Vermont

Music - CAMIPTOWN RACES played one and one

Use any introduction and ending you wish
The Dance

The first lady turns the right hand gent
By the right hand round, the right hand round
Her partner by the left hand round
Lady in the center and seven hands around

Wait while music plays 8 measures of second phrase

Right and left on the corners all
Doodar - Doodar
Right and left back home again
Oh Doodar day
All balance corners, listen to what I say
Swing your partners all around before she runs away
Right and left on the left hand corner
Doodar - Doodar
Dance exactly as I say
Oh Doodar day

All balance corners, listen while I say
Swing your partners all around
Doodar - Doodar day

Other couples do same changes in turn.

The instruction “played one and one” means no repeats in the music: one A and one B.  Here's what I make of it.

A:First lady right-hand turn right-hand gent, left-hand turn partner and go into the centre.
B:The others circle left once around her.
A:Head couples to the right: right and left through, and back.
B:All balance twice to corner.  Swing partner.
A:Head couples to the left: right and left through, and back.
B:All balance twice to corner.  Swing partner.

Doodah        Camptown Races: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 20-Feb-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 4, No.4, November 1953.  Original wording on page 21    Internet Archive
Here is a much older version of “DOODAR” than the one given last month.  Our thanks to Les Hunt, Windsor, CT for this traditional version.  Les says it is exactly as he has called it for many years.

Music - - Camptown Races - l6  bars verse - 16 bars chorus

Intro.
Allemande left your corners all
Doodah!  Doodah!
Right to your honey and grand chain all
Go all the way around.
Meet your partner, pass her by
Doodah!  Doodah!
Remember as you march around
You'll meet her bye and bye.

Chorus
When you get back home
Just give her a little swing
Now put your arm around her waist
And promenade the ring.
Promenade the hall
Promenade the hall
The first young lady get ready to dance
When I begin the call.

Verse
The first head lady give the right hand to -
The right hand gent with a right hand 'round
Now back to your honey with a left hand 'round
Oh!  Doodah Day.
The lady in the center and seven hands 'round
Doodah!  Doodah!
The lady swings out and the gent swings in
'Round the old man again.

Chorus
Gwine to run all night
Gwine to run all day
I'll bet my money on de bob-tail nag
Somebody bet on the bay
Promenade the ring
Oh!  Promenade the ring
Promenade just once around
And listen while I sing.

Verse
Right and left with the corners all
Doodah!  Doodah!
Right and left right back again
Doodah!  Doodah Day!
The ladies chain the other way
Doodah!  Doodah!
Chain those ladies back again
Doodah!  Doodah Day!

Chorus
All balance comers
And now the other way
Swing your honey 'round and 'round
Oh!  Doodah Day!
Promenade the hall
Promenade the hall
The next young lady get ready to dance
When I begin the call.

Repeat with each lady leading out.

Ending
Use the introduction, changing the last two lines

Promenade the hall
Promenade the hall
Thank your lady everyone
That's the end of the call.

This version by contrast uses two A's and two B's.

 Introduction
A1/2:Allemande left corner, grand chain all the way round.
B1:Swing partner.
B2:Promenade.
 Figure
A3:First lady right-hand turn right-hand gent, left-hand turn partner and go into the centre.
A4:The others circle left once around her.
B1:Lady change places with partner and the others circle left around him.
B2:All promenade.
A3:Head couples to the right: right and left through, and back.
A4:Head couples to the left: ladies chain, and back.
B3:All balance once to corner; once to partner.  Swing partner.
B4:Promenade.
Repeat for each lady in turn, then Ending same as Introduction.

Jingle Bells        Jingle Bells: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 20-Feb-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 4, No.5, December 1953.  Original wording on page 24    Internet Archive
Intro:
Address your partners
Honor your corners

The ladies grand chain
Chain 'em home and swing your own
And everybody swing
You swing yours, I'll swing mine
I'd rather swing mine any old time
I'll take mine and promenade
And all the rest the same.
You promenade, oh, promenade,
To your places all
The head two must be ready to go
When they hear the call.

Dance:
The head two join the sides
Forward six you go
Six fall back and don't be slow
The head two do si do
You go right back to place
Then forward six again
The odd two swing in the middle of the ring
While the rest go six hands around
Six hands round - a six hand ring
Round them you will go
When you all are home again
Here is what you do
You allemande with your left hand
And do si do your own
The second couple ready to dance
When you hear the call.

Other couples do the same in turn, with 2nd & 4th couples joining heads; #;3 joining sides.

Ending:
Now do si do your corner
And do si do your partner
Then swing your own.  Everybody swing your own
Swing your partners all alone
Now promenade - you promenade
Around the hall - all around the hall
Around you go and don't be slow
All around let's go
Now that is all there is to this
Thank your partners men - that's all

                         ******

That is exactly the way we called it 7 years ago on a Disc recording, # 5036.  It is an old-time singing call with most of the calls being self explanatory.  Just for the record, here is how it was intended to be danced:

Couple 1 separates with the lady going to couple 2 and the man going to couple 4.  In other words stand beside your corner.  Couple 3 stands in place while the 2 side sets of 3 join hands, walk toward each other and back to place.  Couple 1 do si do.  Then the 2 sets of 3 forward and back again.

Couple 3 now swings in the center of the set while the others join hands around them and walk around to left as the “Odd Couple” swings in the center.

You should have no trouble with the rest of the dance.

Plain Quadrille New Brunswick style        Print this danceTop of page   Added 20-Feb-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 4, No.5, December 1953.  Original wording on page 15    Internet Archive
With the hope that some of our Canadian friends will send in an understandable explanation we're including this “Large Square” quadrille from the Province of New Brunswick, Canada.  Ira Flagg, a Worcester Mass. barber gave it to us several years ago with the casual explanation that it was always the “first square of the evening” and the additional phrase: “men always bow to the ladies whenever possible.”  Mr Flagg seemed more than a little disappointed that we were not able to teach it to the group.  “Any number of couples on a side,” says he.  “Each couple must he facing another couple across the hall.”  Maybe we are really dumb, but since that group was a beginners group it didn't seem like the right one on which to try out an experiment.  Here it is.  You figure it out.

First Figure

Balance partner.  Forward and back.
Cross over and back to place, keeping the ladies inside.
Swing your partner, ladies change and swing.
Ladies change back and swing partner.
Promenade over and back.

Second Figure

Right hand to your partner forward and back
Forward again and pass through.
Coming back the opposite couple passes through.
Back in your places and swing your partner.
Repeat second figure.

Third Figure

Right hand gent and left hand lady swing in the center.
Pass right hand to your partner taking them to the opposite side of the room.
Promenade back to place
Left hand gent and right hand lady swing in the center.
Pass right hand lady to your partner taking them to the opposite side of the room, and promenade back to place.

Fourth Figure

Opposite ladies change and swing, change back and swing your partner.
Right hand side lead forward and back.
Forward again opposite gent taking both ladies.
While he leads up twice.
Then first gent takes both girls, and leads up, meeting you in center, taking his girl to your side and you go to his side and promenade back to place.
Repeat Fourth Figure

Fifth Figure

All join hands forward and back
Promenade over and back with partner
Ladies change over and swing with opposite gents
Ladies back to partners, all join hands again.
Repeat and then all promenade the hall.

This is almost the same dance as given in Lois S. Fahs book “Swing Your Partner” a collection of “Old Time Dances of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick”.  The dance that she notes is from Sackville, N.B. with Medley Wry, “Narrator.”  Her explanation: “Large Square.  Any number of couples on a side.  Each couple must be facing another couple.  Couples facing the music, and couples with backs to music begin the figures. (Couples 1 and 3).  Music - Any fast square dance music.  The relationship between the steps and the music is quite casual.  The time required for each figure depends upon the vigor of the dancers.  The swing is usually taken for an indefinite length of time, each couple swinging as long as they care to.  Those who get dizzy sooner sit down and wait for the more hardy souls.”

Not all of the squares in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia are of this type; there are many “Small Quadrilles”, and many of those from Nova Scotia have five figures to them with the admonition “no pause between figures.”  It is a fascinating book with some grand figures given in it.  If you can't buy a copy - and you probably can't - then try to steal one somewhere!

Heads and Sides        The Barren Rocks of Aden: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 20-Feb-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 4, No.6, February 1954.  Original wording on page 25    Internet Archive
Suggested music - The Barren Rocks of Aden

The head two gents, side two ladies
Forward to the center and back
Go forward again and circle four
And back with a left hand star
To allemande right your partners all
Allemande left your corners too
Do si do your partners all
Take your corner and promenade all.

Repeat twice more for heads
Repeat three times for side gents & head ladies

Then -
All the ladies cross the ring
Give your partner there a swing
When you've swung listen to the call
Take your own and promenade home.

This is almost the same as Ralph Page's “Gents and Corners” which Don Armstrong then used for the singing call “Trail of the Lonesome Pine”.  It's interesting that he calls the figure three times for the head gents and three times for the side gents, rather than the usual two for each, so the ladies have progressed all the way round the square and then half-way more — hence the final move.

Waltz Chassez        Rig-a-jig-jig: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 20-Feb-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 4, No.7, March 1954.  Original wording on page 25    Internet Archive
Canadian
Suggested music - Rig-a-jig-jig

First lady out to the right (joins hands with 2nd)
Gent fall back and join in threes (joins hands with 4)
Go three by three in a waltz chassez
A waltz chassez and three by three
Oh, three by three all over the floor
-------- And on to the next
(“threes” circle clockwise and circle each other keeping to the right.  Lady moves on and gent follows and this is repeated twice)
Now three by three in a Waltz chassez
A waltz chassez in couples three
Around and round you go - and on to the next
Join your hands and around you go
Away you go and away you go
Rig-a-jig-jig and away you go
Hi-ho-hi-ho, hi -ho - and on to the next
Oh four by four all over the floor (first & fourth couples join hands, second and third do the same and in groups of four repeat former figure)
You dance some more, go round some more
Now chassez four around and round and back to your places all
Go allemande left with your corners all
Grand chain all over the hall
Swing your partners when you get home
Then ready to dance some more

Repeat dance for other three couples In turn

Click to play videoNo it's not a waltz: it's a jig.  Listen to the suggested tune and see how closely the phrase “Rig-a-jig-jig and away you go” matches it.

I learnt this as “Bouquet Waltz”, and you can click the image on the right to see the version I know called by Nils Fredland at the Ralph Page Dance Legacy Weekend in 2013 — he's using reels.  In this version the first gent waits while his partner circles with the twos, then she moves on to the threes, he moves on to the twos, and these circles of three “waltz” round each other.  Then she moves on to the fours, he moves on to the threes to do the same.  Finally the gent joins his partner with the fours, the twos and threes join up, and two circles of four do the bouquet waltz.  Nils finishes with swing and promenade whereas Ralph finishes with allemande left, grand chain all the way round and swing, but I'd say you can put in whatever you like at that point!

Canadian Square        Set de la Baie-St-Paul: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 20-Feb-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 4, No.8, May 1954.  Original wording on page 34    Internet Archive

The tune, which Ralph prints but doesn't name, is the traditional French-Canadian “Set de la Baie-St-Paul”.

Any introduction you wish

First couple out to the right of the ring
And circle four hands round
On the corner of the set you dip and dive six - couples 1, 2 and three.
Dip right through to number three and circle four
On the other corner you dip and dive six - couples 1, 3 and 4.
Dip right through to the last and circle four again
Dip and dive six across the set - couples 1,4 and 2.
Allemande left with the corners all
Right hand to partner and Grand Chain all
All swing out when you come home
Swing your little girl all alone

Second couple to the right of the ring
And circle four hands round
You right and left six with couples three and four
Then circle four with couple four
Right and left six, you are not done
Right and left with four and one
You circle four with your head couple
Right and left six up and down the hall - couples 2, 1 & 3

Allemande left with your corners all
Allemande right your own
Balance to your corners all
Swing your own around the hall

Third couple out to the right of the ring
And circle four hands round
Three ladies chain on the corners - couples 3,4 & 1
On to the next and circle four exactly as before

On the other corner three ladies chain - 3, 1 & 2
Circle four with couple two, three ladies chain across the set - 3, 2 & 4
When you're home, you swing your own, swing her all alone - Then promenade your partner home

Last couple out to the right of the ring
And circle four right there
Dip and dive six on the corners of the set - 4, 1 & 2
Then circle four with couple two
On the other corner you right and left six - 4, 2 & 3
Circle four with your last, three ladies chain up and down the set - 4, 3 & 1

An ending:

Allemande left with your corners all
Right hand to your partner and Grand Chain all
Honor your lady and pass her by
Wink at the next girl on the sly
Kiss the next as you go by
And swing your own when you get home.
Promenade all right off the floor
Thank your partner, for that is all.

Let's see if I can fit this to the music.

A1/2:Ones lead out to twos and circle left about three-quarters so that the ones are on the outside of a diagonal column of three couples: ones, twos and threes.  Twos arch: dip and dive, possibly with a California twirl as you reach each end — all the way and one extra change so the twos are home and the ones are facing the threes.  This is reminiscent of the dance “Redwing”.
B1/2:Ones and threes circle left about three-quarters so that the ones are on the outside of a diagonal column of three couples: ones, threes and fours.  Threes arch: dip and dive — all the way and one extra change so the threes are home and the ones are facing the fours.
A3/4:Ones and fours circle left about three-quarters so that the ones are on the outside of a column of three couples across the hall: ones, fours and twos.  Fours arch: dip and dive — all the way and one extra change so the ones can back out in their home place.
B3/4:Allemande left corner, grand chain all the way round, swing partner.

Repeat with second couple leading — the final dip and dive will be up and down the hall this time, and there's a different move following the allemande left.  I don't know why you'd want to balance to your corner and then swing your partner, but that's what it says.

When the third couple leads, however, it's a different figure.  Instead of dip and dive, it's “three ladies chain”.  Don't confuse this with the “All three ladies chain” you might do in a circle of three couples, such as in Pat Shaw's dances “The Pride of Newcastle” or “The American Husband”.  This is again done in the column of three couples.  Ones and twos do a ladies chain but the second man wheels only half-way with the first lady and then chains her to the third man, receiving the third lady whom he then chains to the first man and so on, till all are back with partners.  But what about the extra change to leave the ones facing the threes?  I imagine the ones retain the courtesy turn hold and promenade past the twos (I suggest going inside them) to meet the threes.

And then the fourth couple go back to the dip and dive.  It seems very strange that only the third couple get to lead a different figure, and Ralph doesn't give any explanation.  Maybe someone happened to call it that way by mistake and Ralph wrote down what he heard — I don't suppose we'll ever know.

Aroostook Special        American Patro: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 20-Feb-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 4, No.9, July 1954.  Original wording on page 22    Internet Archive
as called by Rod Linnell

Music: “American Patrol” played by Cliffie Stone on a Capitol Record

Any introduction you wish.

The two head couples out to the right
And balance with those two
Now join your hands and circle left
It's half way round you go.
Half ladies chain now with those two
And you right and left right through
Half right and left and take that lady
Right back home with you.

Chorus:

Now allemande left your corner
And right hand round your own
Go back and take your corner girl
And promenade her home.

Repeat for sides - then heads - then sides.

I struggled with this because a right and left through and back leaves the heads on the outside which means the men will be out of sequence when they try to promenade home.  But if it's supposed to be called to those words, there isn't enough time for all that.  I think the caller is expecting the dancer to “stack” the calls and then do them in sequence.  So I think “Half right and left” is just amplifying the previous line — pointing out that it's half-way and not all the way — rather than being a separate move.  After all, if it was back he'd just have said “Right and left back” rather than putting in that confusing “Half”.  That gives us:

A1:Heads lead to the right to face this side couple; balance the ring.  Circle left half-way (for which there seems to be too much music) so the heads are now on the outside.
A2:Same two ladies chain across.  Same four right and left through.
B1:Promenade new partner to the man's place.  The sides are on the outside so they start to promenade all the way round the set, while the heads tuck in behind and follow them.

It's only 24 bars rather than the standard 32, but that's OK.  And the other thing I don't understand is that Chorus which is also a change partner figure — that's not what choruses are supposed to do!

The head ladies have moved right and the side ladies have moved left, so if you repeated the figure for the heads they would all be back home.  That's why Rod specifies Heads, Sides, Heads, Sides.

It appears in the book “Square Dances from a Yankee Caller's Clipboard” (Rod Linnell and Louise Winston, 1974) and if someone can tell me what that says I'll be pleased to correct my version.

Nine-Pin        Brighton Camp: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 20-Feb-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 4, No.10, December 1954.  Original wording on page 40    Internet Archive
as called by Dick Anderson, Hyannis, Mass.

Suggested music: “Girl I left Behind Me” Folkcraft record # F1213-A

Intro.

 Now all join hands and circle left
Circle left, now mind you,
Circle left all the way 'round,
So we'll know where to find you.
Now all join hands, go forward and back,
Into the center all four,
Forward again with a great big yell
Then stay there on the floor.

Figure.

The two head couples forward and back
Forward again, circle four around the ninepin
Circle left, all the way 'round.
And when you're home you swing,
Swing that gal, that pretty little gal,
The Gel You Left Behind You.

The first gent lead to the right and swing,
And elbow swing in the center of the ring,
Then lead on to the next and swing,
And circle three in the center of the ring,
Then lead on to the next and swing
And circle four in the center of the ring,
And keep on going with the dear old thing.
Keep on going, right around the town,
Keep on going, don't slow down,
Keep on going, I didn't say stop *

(*) At this point the music stops and everyone must find a partner and swing.  Someone will be left out and that person becomes the nine-pin.  The music starts again for the swing and dancers will promenade back to gent's original position.  The smart caller will vary the length of time for the circle of five, sometimes cutting it short.

Explanation


The first gent leads to the right and swing the second lady.  The second gent joins the nine-pin in the center for an elbow swing.  After the swing, the second lady remains in position, the active gent going on to the next lady, etc. so that after all ladies have been swung the active gent goes into the center so that we have five persons in the center and four ladies on the outside.  After the music break the dance continues with the two side couples forward and back and the second gent becomes active.

The dance involves the usual nine-pin formation.  The nine-pin being either male or female.  It is strictly a fun dance with much of the success of the dance depending on the timing of the caller.

I picked up the original figure from Dick Chase at Richmond.  Of course I dropped much of his wild sashays and changed the sequence and added a little patter.

D.A.

I must say I prefer the “wild sashays” (or “gallops” as we say in England) — you can see the English version at barndances.org.uk/detail.php?Title=Ninepins

Jingle Bells Square        Jingle Bells: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 20-Feb-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 4, No.11, January 1955.  Original wording on page 17    Internet Archive
Some years ago we choreographed this Jingle Bells square to RONDO - 140 and some of us like to dance it just this way each year.  If you do not have, or cannot find this recording, no doubt you can adapt this routine to one that you have.

Intro:

Honor your partner, honor corner
With your partner swing
You swing your own around and around
Then promenade and si—ing
Jingle bells, jingle bells
Jingle all the way
Oh what fun it is to ride
In a one horse open sleigh!

1.
HEAD two couples up and back
Side two couples swing
Head two couples dos-a-dos
And back into the ring

SIDE two couples up and back
Head two couples swing
Side two couples dos-a-dos
And back into the ring

Chorus:

Circle left, circle left
On around the ring
Keep on going round and round
Then promenade and si—ing

Jingle bells, jingle bells
Jingle all the way
Oh what fun it is to ride
In a one horse open sleigh

Break;- 16 counts: Grand Square (single, without calls heads advance, sides retire, etc.)

HEAD two couples right hand star
Side two couples swing
Head two couples left hand star
And back into the ring
SIDE two couples right hand star
Head two couples swing
Side two couples left hand star
And back into the ring

Chorus


Break - 8 counts: Chassez out, then back (all still facing center, p'trs separate as M chassez 4 to L, then back to place - W rpt.)

3.
 FOUR lil sisters  step inside
Single file around
When you meet your partner, stop
And turn the one you found
FOUR big brothers step outside
Single file around
When you meet your partner, stop
And turn the one you found

Chorus


Break - 8 counts: Chassez out, then back, honor partner. Alternate: HEAD two couples split to side (Partners separate - M to L- W to R, 4 in line)
Up and back with grace (up 1, arch)
Up again and partners turn (back: 1, arch)
You turn them back to place (2 hand)
SIDE two couples split to head
Up and back with grace
Up again and partners turn
You turn them back to place

Chorus - All hands joined, in to the center and back -

Honor partners.

Follow the Leader        Print this danceTop of page   Added 20-Feb-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 4, No.11, January 1955.  Original wording on page 27    Internet Archive
As called by TED SANNELLA

Suggested music - any good breakdown you like

The head two couples, go forward and back
Forward again and half right and left
Do si do your corner there
Then do the same with your lady fair
All join hands and circle to the left
First gent turn outside and reverse back in single file
Follow the leader a good long mile (Active gent breaks  the circle and turns to his left - others follow after in single file)
Now join your hands and circle to the right
Swing the lady on your right (new partner)
Promenade the same once around the square.

Repeat for heads; then twice for the sides, with gents 2, 3 and 4 breaking the ring to reverse back.

That's a 48-bar figure.  I believe Ted later changed the first part to:

A1:Heads right and left through; sides right and left through; heads right and left back.

and took out the final promenade to cut it down to 32 bars.

The Skimmelton        Buffalo Gals: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 20-Feb-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 4, No.12, February 1955.  Original wording on page 22    Internet Archive
BY NORMAN CAZDEN
Music - Buffalo Gals

The Skimmelton is a traditional aftermath of weddings in the Catskill Mountain area of New York State.  Similar practices are known in many other places by different names.

After the bride and groom have gone home, their relatives, friends and neighbors gather about their house, arriving silently in little groups.  As the evening grows later, occasional noises are made to disturb the happy couple, all in friendly spirit.  Loud conversations spring up, tin pots are banged on rocks, serenades of song and shouting and laughter come suddenly under windows, and other imaginative sounds suggest that the place is haunted.

By midnight the situation is sure to have grown intolerable.  The expected remedy is for the distracted bride and groom to come out and welcome the gathering.  They bring out baskets of fruit and other food as well as some “mountain dew” applejack, and join in the impromptu celebration.  Dancing and singing are interspersed with well-wishing, and then the guests depart so the couple can be alone.

The Skimmelton dance, performed at the Fourteenth Annual Folk Festival of the Catskill Mountains at Phoenicia last August, is a variant of Buffalo Gal, and the calls are sung to that tune.  The music should he moderate in speed, and the steps call for precise timing.  At * the ladies keep hold of each other's hands, gents duck under to left of their partners then take hands and lift them over the ladies' shoulders.  At ** the gents keep hold of hands, ladies drop hands, take hands again inside the circle and lift them over the gents' shoulders.

First gents.

Turn the right hand lady with the left hand around
Then your partner with the left hand around
On to your opposite with the right hand around
Then your own with the left hand around
Now turn your corner with the right hand around
Then your partner with the left hand around
Swing your partners all around
And promenade the hall.

Repeat with second, third, then fourth gents

Refrain:
All ladies to the center and circle four
Gents to the right, find your own once more
* Under and over with a basket weave
And circle left before you leave
** Now turn that basket inside out
And swing like thunder the other way about
Drop that basket and hug your fruit
And promenade the hall.

Head gents - turn the right hand lady with the right hand, etc.

Repeat with side gents; then all gents - not too fast!

Refrain: All ladies to the center and circle four etc.

I'm sure it should start with turning the right-hand lady by the right, not the left, and indeed when he talks about both head gents starting the figure that's what he says.



Volume 5

Plain Quadrille        St. Lawrence Jig: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 19-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 5, No. 1, March 1955.  Original wording on page 30    Internet Archive
Plain Quadrille
As called by Ralph Sweet, Windsor Locks, Conn.
Suggested music - “St Lawrence Jig” MH 1507

Head couples forward and back
Circle four with right hand couple
Head couples forward and back again
Circle four with left-hand couple
Sashay four with right hand couple - social dance position: slide past other couple 8 slides, men back to back; slide back 8 slides, ladies back to back
Sashay four with left hand couple - same as above
Ladies chain with right hand couple
Ladies chain with left hand couple
Half promenade, half right & left with right hand couple
Half promenade, half right & left with left hand couple
All join hands, forward and back
Swing partners and all promenade

Repeat for side couples

Ralph Sweet taught this old time square at the New Hampshire Year End Camp, 1953.  He got it from Harold Gates, Cromwell, Conn. who used to say “the other way” instead of “with the left hand couple” - this was O.K. if they knew the dance.  He also referred to the “Sashay Four” as “Balancez”.  I have heard other callers since, call it “Sashay Four” so l adopted it as less confusing.  This figure is derived from the “Promenade Four” and is called “Balance” or “Balance Four” in many old call books.  - Ralph Sweet, 1/10/54


No difficulties of interpretation here.  Instead of “sashay” I would say “Take ballroom hold and gallop past the other couple, men passing back to back, then back again with women passing back to back” - but then I'm English.  Of course the ladies chain is over and back.  Twice through the tune fits all but the last two lines, so you need another 8 bars for the forward and back and swing, and another 8 bars for the promenade.

Somebody Goofed        Print this danceTop of page   Added 19-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 5, No. 2, August 1955.  Original wording on page 31    Internet Archive

An original dance by Ruth Stillion, Coos Bay, Oregon.  Windsor Record #7140

Note to dancers: The following calls won't mean a thing to you when you get into the dance.  A detailed explanation of each figure would only spoil your fun.  We suggest that you pay up your insurance, lay back your ears…and hope for the best.  You are supposed to end up with your original partner, but it won't be the end of western civilization if you don't.

The head two, a right and left through, sides you do the same
The head two, a right and left back, sides do it again
All four couples right and left…grand around the ring
You meet your corner maid and promenade, and everybody sing.
Somebody goofed, somebody goofed
We don't know who it was…but somebody goofed.

Allemande left, the ladies star, the gentlemen promenade
Allemande left, the gentlemen star, the ladies promenade
Allemande left the corner girl, do si do your own
Find your right hand lady, boys, and promenade her home.

Somebody goofed, etc.

Swing the one across the hall, wink at the corner gal
Star right back and turn your own, a left hand round your pal
Do si do your corners all, balance to your own
Find the one who winked at you, and promenade the hall

Chorus:…

The four gents lead to the right, balance to that gal
Pass the one behind you, a left to the corner…pal
Star right across the set, a left hand round her there
Find the one you balanced to, and promenade the square

Chorus:…

Swing the corner lady, swing her round and round
Swing the next one down the line, bounce her up & down
Go back home and swing your own, now listen to the call
Find the one you. haven't swung, and promenade the hall

Chorus:…

Allemande left the corners, then do an allemande thar
Go right and left and then the gentlemen, form a right hand star
Shoot the  star, go all the way, do si corners all
Find the one you. had in the star, and promenade the hall.

Chorus:…

Bow low to your partner, swing the corner high
Allemande left in the usual way, and pass your partner by
Do-si -do the next one, she ought to be your own
Find the one who passed you by, and promenade her home.

Chorus:…

Sing the chorus during the promenade, if you want to.  otherwise, just listen to the music and fight your own confusion.

The tune is still in copyright (Al Hoffman died in 1960 but Dick Manning lived on until 1991) so I'm not reproducing it here, but you can hear the song at youtube.com/watch?v=wpxqd9diA14

Maybe the dancers wouldn't understand the call, but I'd like to try and explain it to the callers amongst you!  There are 16 bars for each section followed by an 8-bar promenade.

A:Heads right and left through; sides the same.  Heads the same; sides the same.
B:Grand chain, but only three places: meet your corner with a left and…
C:Promenade to the man's place — remember you now have a new corner.
A:Allemande left corner, ladies star right, men promenade anti-clockwise.  Same corner allemande left, men star right, ladies promenade.
B:Allemande left corner, do-si-do (current) partner, then walk past to original partner.
C:Promenade.
A:Men cross over, swing opposite (just once around) and wink at current corner (original right-hand lady)
B:Men star right half-way; left-hand turn partner ¾ to meet right-hand lady (the one you winked at).
C:Promenade to the man's place.
A:Men move to right-hand lady; balance once.  Men move back past partner, allemande left corner.
B:Men star right half-way; left-hand turn opposite all the way and a bit more to face current corner (original right-hand lady).
C:Promenade to the man's place — all now with opposite.
A:Swing corner.  Swing new corner (original partner).
B:Men cross the set to swing current partner, then men move to right-hand lady.
C:Promenade to the man's place — now with original corner.
A:Allemande left corner to an “allemande thar”: pull by right partner, give left forearm to the next and turn till the men can make a right-hand star — men move backwards, ladies forwards (but not for long).
B:“Shoot the star”: left-arm turn all the way to face corner.  Do-si-do, then back to current partner.
C:Promenade to the man's place — now with right-hand lady.
A:Bow to partner, swing corner (original partner).  Allemande left new corner, walk past partner.
B:Do-si-do the next (right-hand lady), then men roll back to original partner.
C:Promenade.

To my surprise the instructions worked out for me first time!  The call “All four couples right and left…grand” is designed to fool the dancers: we've had heads and sides alternately doing a right and left through, so the dancers assume that somehow all four couples must do a right and left through, and there are a couple of seconds panic, then laughter, and the grand chain will start late so that you just meet your corner in time to promenade.  Callers, you need to emphasise the word “corner” — everyone expects the chain to finish with the person they started with.  But for heaven's sake, don't walk the whole thing through!  That's not what it's all about.  Choose a group of dancers who are quick on the uptake and can move quickly, and just go for it!

Canadian Lancers        Print this danceTop of page   Added 19-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 5, No. 3, October 1955.  Original wording on page 31    Internet Archive
Obtained from Norman Lindsay, London, Ontario, who says this is a real old timer, close to 100 years old.

Suggested music - Any good marching tune

The Dance

Head couple bow and swing
Promenade a half way 'round
And back up center (between # 3)
The side two couples fall in behind
Four steps forward, four steps backward
Ladies round the gents (single file, following #1 lady)
Gents go 'round the ladies (single file same as ladies)
Head couple down the center (others follow after)
Ladies left, gents go right
Make new lines of four
Face your own - go forward and back
Forward again and swing partners into place
Square your sets

Repeat for other couples in turn.  Using any chorus figure you wish.  Also any ending, after all have done the figure.

We learned this figure at Dixie Folk & Square Dance Institute 1954, and danced it again to Norman's calling this past summer.  It's a wonderful dance for a Gay Ninety Evening - or any other kind of a square dance night.  It would seem in better taste to use comparable music, rather than the latest razzamatazz, but you are the one to call so let your conscience be your guide.

No problem understanding this once you realise that “Head couple” means “First couple”.  I believe “bow and swing” means take inside hands, balance away from partner and a quick swing (probably just once around, walked), so I would phrase the dance like this as a 48-bar figure:

A1:Ones bow and swing.  Promenade outside the set half-way.
A2:Ones split the threes and lead up to home place; twos and threes wheel in as they pass to face up in a column of four couples.  All lead up (three steps and together); fall back.
B1:Ladies single file up and round the men to finish where they started this move.
B2:Men the same round the ladies.
C1:Ones lead down the middle, the others move up the outside and follow them down, then separate (men right, ladies left) and cast up the outside to form side lines of four facing partner.
C2:Lines forward and back.  All swing to place.

Repeat for the other couples in turn.

The Lancers was a very popular 19th century quadrille; you'll see it mentioned on my Connections page, and Susan de Guardiola says at www.kickery.com/2008/11/the-regencyera-pas-de-basque.html At one point in the figure the dancers have formed a column of couples (the distinguishing feature of the various Lancers sets)… I'm guessing that when the sides wheel in the twos are above the threes, but it doesn't really matter so long as people move with conviction!  For the final swing, the two people on the wrong side of the set (the second woman and third man) need to cross rapidly to meet their partner.  I agree with Ralph that a traditional dance needs a traditional tune, but I don't agree that you need to add a chorus figure and an ending — to me the dance stands on its own as 4 x 48-bar reels or jigs.

Climbing up de Golden Stairs        Print this danceTop of page   Added 19-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 5, No. 4, December 1955.  Original wording on page 23    Internet Archive
Recorded on FOLK DANCER MH1517 by Don Armstrong's Quadrille Orchestra - Don Armstrong calling on MH1515

It's left hand round your corner
Right elbow swing your partner - SING
Climbing up de golden stairs
Then left hand round your corner
Two hand swing your partner - SING
Climbing up de golden stairs
Now right hand round your corner
Left elbow swing your partner - SING
Climbing up de golden stairs
And do si do your corner
And do si do your partner - SING
Climbing up de golden stairs
Swing your comer lady round - sung slowly
Then promenade your square      “       ”
Let's sing that crazy song again   “      ”
Climbing up de golden stairs

Repeat entire dance three more times, 4 times in all

“CLIMBING UP DE GOLDEN STAIRS” is an  old-time minstrel song and we've heard many an “end man” and chorus sing it in old-time minstrel shows - a bit of musical Americana that we'd like to see revived once in a while.  Don Armstrong has done a superlative job of calling on the record, and we'll go out on a limb and state that it is going to be around for a long, long time.  If you use the record do not try to use an introduction or an ending; if you use live music, either or both are optional.


A very simple singing square — you can see a video at www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sf3jt3pNWTE.

Duck to the Center        Big John McNeil: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 19-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 5, No. 5, February 1956.  Original wording on page 29    Internet Archive
As called by Norman Epstein - 55-56 Year End Camp

Suggested music - Big John McNeil MH 5011.

Use any introduction, chorus figures and ending

Head two gents lead out to the right
And circle three hands round
Duck to the center, swing your original opposite lady
And the side two couples half right and left over
Same active men lead on to the right
And circle three hands around
Now duck to the center and swing your own
While the side two couples right and left home

chorus figure


Side two men lead out to the right
And circle three hands round
Duck to the center, swing your original opposite lady
And the head two couples half right and left over
Same active men lead on to the right
And circle three hands round
How duck to the center and swing your own
While the head two couples right and left home

chorus figure


Repeat entire dance for the two head ladies; then once more for the two side ladies, using any chorus figures you like.  End with any usual figure.

Only a 16-bar figure but very busy!  The sides have 8 bars to circle left half-way, arch to let the head men through, California twirl, right and left through and immediately be ready for the next circle.

For many years I've been using a version which has been through the Folk Process, though at www.library.unh.edu/special/ forms/rpdlw/syllabus2009.pdf (page 35) it is claimed to come from this version of Northern Junket:

A1:Head men to the right, circle left with this couple just over half-way, pop through arch and swing the opposite lady.
A2:Side men the same.
B1:All circle left half-way.  Swing new corner.
B2:Promenade to the man's place.
 Ladies have moved Left.

I must say I prefer this version!

It's a Long Way to Tipperary        It's a Long Way to Tipperary: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 19-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 5, No. 6, March 1956.  Original wording on page 21    Internet Archive

Believed to be by Ralph Page.

Verse:

All four ladies walk right round
The inside of the ring,
When you get back home again
You balance and you swing;
Swing your colleen everyone
Then leave her standing there
A left hand round the right hand girl
And all four gentlemen star
By the right hand, in the center of the ring
Then go back the other way by the left
A right hand round the comer girl
And do si do your own
Go back and swing your corner lady
Yes you swing her, then promenade her home (SING)
It's A Long Way To Tipperary
It's A Long Way To Go.

Repeat three more times, til all have original partners

Repeat four more times for “all four men walk around”.  In this sequence, men move one place to their left each time as ladies promenade their corner man home.  Her home position, not his!

You can hear Jack Judge, who wrote the song, singing it at www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Xeg4ijHx_E and I'm giving my version of the tune and chords — I decided the whistling version at 2 minutes was clearer for this purpose.  The call fits the verse of the tune well, but the section starting “By the right hand…” doesn't seem to fit the chorus at all well — I could rewrite the words so that they did, but that's not my job!

Lady round the Lady        Lady round the Lady: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 19-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 5, No. 7, October 1956.  Original wording on page 38    Internet Archive
Any introduction you like that uses 16 measures of music:

Couple 1 - Out to the right and ----

Lady round the lady, the gent walk round the gent
The Gent go round the lady, lady round the gent
Half right & left six, go right across the set
Leading couple to the middle and lead on to the next;
Where it's lady round the lady, gent go round the gent
Gent go round the lady and the lady round the gent
Half lady's chain then swing the one you've got
Swing her in the center and you take her to the last
And it's lady round the lady, gent around the gent
Gent go round the lady, lady round the gent
Half right and left six, til you all get home again
Swing your partner once or twice and listen to the call!

Use a break figure for 16 measures of music

Then repeat figure for other couples in turn - then:

The two head couples to the right and ----

The ladies round the lady; gents go round the gent
The gents around the lady; the ladies round the gent
All right and left eight across the set and back

When you're all back home again you swing your partners all.
Take your lady with you and promenade the hall.

Repeat for two side couples

Use any ending figure you wish and end dance ----

All join hands and circle left, circle once around
You all are going wrong so back the other way
Bow to your partners one and all
And that's the end of the call.

This is a really interesting one.  The tune and some of the figure are used for the dance “Swanee” (which to my surprise I can't find anywhere on the web).  I imagine someone has taken Ralph's advice to use their own break figure and then decided that we need a break from the tune as well, so you get a chunk of “Way down upon the Swanee River” by Stephen Foster (which is officially called “Old Folks at Home” and it also seems that it's “Suwanee” rather that “Swanee”).  (To add to the confusion, Volume 14 Number 7 has a square called “Swanee” to the tune “Swanee (How I love ya)” which has no connection with any of this.)  But while adding a break (and a circle four after the figure eight) they've also lost part of the figure, so let's write it out as Ralph Page intended.  I've added the obvious break.  “Right and left six” is a figure used in a dance actually called “Right and Left Six” which was old in 1925: a right and left through for three couples, no taking right hands, courtesy turn at the end.  In the first figure it's just half-way, so the twos and fours have changed places and the ones are back in the middle.

A+B:Allemande left corner, grand chain all the way, quick swing at home.
A:Ones out to the right: full figure eight through the twos.
B:Half right and left six (see above).
A:Ones figure eight through the threes.
B:Same two couples ladies chain across.  Swing this new partner.
A:Ones (first man and third lady) on to the last position — actually it's the twos again — and figure eight through them.
B:Half right and left six so the sides are home, and all a quick swing.
A+B:Break
 Repeat the figure and break with the twos leading it, at the end of which all the ladies will be with their opposite man.  Then with the threes and fours leading it, and I doubt if the man who wrote the dance realised that the original third and fourth ladies never get a chance to lead the figure!  I thought of changing the order to ones, threes, twos, fours, but that means the first lady leads the figure twice and then the second lady twice!  In my experience, in a square where each couple in turn leads the figure you're always with your original partner at the start of the figure, but Ralph says “swing the one you've got” to make it clear that the head men have a new partner.  I'd be inclined to change it to a ladies chain there and back.
A:Both head couples lead out to the right and do a figure eight through this side couple, so the head couples finish standing back to back with each other facing their side couple.
B+A:“Right and left eight” — the same principle as a right and left six, but this time you're passing more people and it's all the way instead of half-way so it takes 16 bars with time for a quick swing into home position at the end.
B:Promenade.
 Repeat this with the side couples leading.
 Ralph says “Use any ending figure you wish and end dance” but then he gives his own ending which I don't think much of — the choice is yours!

Old-Time Square from Conn.        Nights of Gladness, 1st figure: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 20-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 5, No. 8, December 1956.  Original wording on page 27    Internet Archive
Head, couples forward & back & circle four with right hand couple
    Repeat with left hand couple
Heads right & left four with right hand couples
    Repeat with left hand couples
Heads sashay four with right hand couple (Social dance position; slide past other couples 8 slide steps, men back to back; Slide back women back to back)
    Repeat for left hand couples
Ladies chain with the right hand couple
    Repeat with the left hand couple
Half promenade with the right hand couple
Half right and left with the same, to place
    Repeat with the left hand couple
All join hands, forward and back
All swing partners and promenade

This figure is from Ralph Sweet, Windsor Locks, Conn. who in turn obtained it from the former Harold Gates of Cromwell, Conn.  Since it is a real old timer we have set it to the given music which is part of a quadrille “Nights of Gladness”, the first figure, in fact.

Writing about the dance Ralph Sweet says: “In giving the directions, Harold Gates used to say 'The other way' instead of 'with the left hand couple' - this was O.K. if they knew the dance.  He also referred to the 'Sashay Four' as 'Balancez',” pronounced 'Balansay'.  I have heard other callers call it 'Sashay Four' so I adopted it as less confusing.  This figure is derived from “Promenade Four”, and is called “Balance” or “Balance Four”, in many old call books.

The music “Nights of Gladness”, is in traditional old- time quadrille style; the style made famous by a great many music publishing houses, such as Elias Howe, J.P.Pepper, Oliver Ditern, E.P.Root, Carl Fisher, etc.  We found it in volume 3 of “Collection of Irish Airs, Marches & Dance Tunes” compiled in Ireland by F. Roche.  A copy of which was recently sent us from England by Dr. Hugh Thurston, of Bristol, England.

Far be it from us to try to inaugurate a “trend” in anything, least of all dance music, but it would sure be wonderful to once more hear some tunes more in keeping with square dancing than some we've heard recently.  Perhaps, after we've gotten rid of a lot of the hanky-panky afflicting modern square dancing, we shall see a return to more tuneful and less raucous type of music.

No difficulties of interpretation here.  Quadrille music isn't in the AABB format we're used to from English and American country dances.  It's in Rondo form which means you play ABAC repeatedly and do your best to end on an A-music!

When the Work's All Done This Fall        When the Work's All Done This Fall: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 20-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 5, No. 9, February 1957.  Original wording on page 41    Internet Archive

Any introduction and ending you wish

First head couple to the right and circle once around,
Leave your lady, go to the next and circle three around
Take that lady with you and circle four with the next
Kiss her goodbye, leave her there, and go back home alone
The two side gents, turn the right hand lady
With the right hand right around
And the left hand lady the left hand right around
They right and left with the right hand lady
With that couple over there, and right and left right home
With the left hand lady they both sashay with the two across the way
Sashay right back home, you ain't got long to stay
The two lone gents go do si do on your heel and toe
Take your corner lady and all promenade home, go once around the ring.

Repeat for other couples in turn, til all have original partners back again.

Here's how I would phrase this to the music, which is a 16-bar reel.

A:First couple out to the right and circle left with the twos.  First gent leave your partner in a line with the twos, move on to the threes and circle left with them.
B:First gent take the third lady, roll her across to your right, and circle left with the fours.  First gent go home alone, so the side gents have a lady on each side of them and the head gents are on their own.
A:Side gents right-hand turn your right-hand lady — take the full 8 counts.  Left-hand turn your left-hand lady.
B:Side gents and right-hand lady face the head couple on your right: Right and left through, and back.
A:Side gents take left-hand lady in ballroom hold: gallop across 8 steps (gents passing back to back, and you can go a lot further than just to the other couple's place).  Gallop back with the ladies passing back to back.
B:Head gents do-si-do.  All promenade corner to the gent's place.

But this gives only 8 counts for the promenade, which can't be done.  You could add in a swing before or after the promenade, but then the figure would end on an A-music, and I don't see how I can speed things up (or slow them down) to fit a number of full times through the tune.  I could speed up the side gents turning their right-hand lady and left-hand lady — but surely the right and left through needs to start at the start of a phrase, not half-way through, and the same with the gallops and the do-si-do. And as with Lady round the Lady the fact that it's a change partner dance means that the ladies don't get an equal share of the action.  In fact the ladies do the same thing all four times, albeit from different positions — it's always the original first lady who is led out to the couple on the right, etc.  Maybe I'm just being fussy — maybe Ralph didn't care that it was across the music and none of the ladies was willing to speak up!

There's a totally different singing call to this tune at squaredancehistory.org/items/show/572

There's a cut down version of the call on scholars.unh.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi? article=1358&context=american_squares page 43 and this isn't a change partner version, though again I don't see how to “time it to a square dance tune” as the article suggests.

Cock of the North        Cock of the North: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 20-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 5, No. 10, April 1957.  Original wording on page 34    Internet Archive
Any introduction and ending you wish

First couple balance the right hand two
Do si do with the same ones too,
Reel the same with the left elbow
Now your own with the right elbow
First couple duck under those they face (couple 2)
Promenade round to the next in place (couple 3)
Raise your hands while they pass under to right and left with the ones you left (3 with 2)
You lead to the last and circle four
Then dive right under to your place
All swing partners and promenade

Repeat for the other couples in turn

I'm not giving Ralph's version of this traditional tune as I already have my own.  And I'm guessing at the meaning of some of the instructions, so if you know better please contact me and I'll correct this.

A1:Ones lead out to the right and form a ring with the twos; balance the ring.  Do-si-do opposite.
A2:Left-elbow swing opposite (twice around).  Right-elbow swing partner (twice around).
B1:Twos arch, ones promenade under the arch, round to the right and into the middle to face the threes, then ones arch, threes duck under.
B2:Twos and threes do a right and left through, and back, while the ones do a California twirl and move in to face the fours.
A3:Ones and fours circle left half-way; fours arch, ones move under the arch to home place.  All swing partner.
B3:All promenade.

That makes it a 48-bar figure, so twice through the figure will get you back in step with the music — that's good enough for me!

Darling Nellie Gray        Darling Nellie Gray: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 20-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 5, No. 11, June 1957.  Original wording on page 26    Internet Archive
as called by Rod Linnell, Peru, Maine

Folk Dancer MH509


Now the first couple right
And you balance with those two
And you circle to the left just once around
Right half around the opposite
Then balance four in line
And you walk right through and swing your Nellie Gray
Then on to the next and you balance where you are
And you circle to the left just once around
Right hand half around your opposite
Then balance four in line
And you walk right through and swing your Nellie Gray
Then it's up to the last and you balance with the two
And you circle to the left just once around
Right hand half around your opposite
Then you balance four in line
And then everybody swing your Nellie Gray

chorus:

Allemande left with the lady on your left
Then right hand to your partner for a grand right and left
When you meet your partner
You promenade her home
Promenade with your Darling Nellie Gray

The same for the other couples in turn

Any ending you wish that will fit the music

This time I feel confident that I understand the figure, and it fits twice through the tune, i.e. 64 bars.

A:Ones lead out to the right and make a ring with the twos; balance the ring.  Circle left.
B:Right-hand turn opposite ¾ and the men give left hands to make a wave; balance the wave.  Step forward and both couples swing, twos finishing at home, ones finishing in the middle facing the threes.
C+D:Same with the threes.
A+B:Same with the fours, and all swing at home.
C+D:Allemande left corner, grand chain half-way.  Promenade home with partner (and there should be time for a quick swing, though that isn't specified).

Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight (circle)        Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 20-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 5, No. 11, June 1957.  Original wording on page 29    Internet Archive

In the same issue is a circle mixer:

Music - the same - suggested record: Windsor 7115

Position: Couples in circle facing center.  Lady at mans right.

Call:
It's allemande left with the lady on your left
Allemande right with the lady on your right (Pass by partner, allemande right with the next lady)
Allemande left with the lady on your left (Pass by partner, allemande left with original corner lady)
Swing your pretty partner round and round
Let's all join hands and circle to the left
Break that ring, swing your corner once around
Promenade home with the girl that you just swung
(Sing) “There'll be a Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight”.

Continue as long as desired.

I'm including this because there's a well-known singing square (still current in England in the 21st century) which you can see at barndances.org.uk/detail.php?Title=Hot_Time_in_the_Old_Town_Tonight and the start of this circle mixer probably forms the basis of that square.  And “swing your corner” followed by “promenade home” certainly belongs to a square rather than a circle.

Nancy's Fancy        Print this danceTop of page   Added 21-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 5, No. 12, October 1957.  Original wording on page 31    Internet Archive

Pretty much the way Don Armstrong called it at Maine Camp

Music - Any reel

Intro, chorus figures & ending ad lib

Head two couples forward and back
Side two couples forward and back
All four ladies grand chain
Half way over and swing
Head two ladies chain to the right
And swing the one you've found
Head two couples pass through
Separate around just two
Stand there four in line
Forward eight and back like that
Girls cross over for a left allemande
Allemande left and a right and left grand
Every other lady by every other hand
Meet your partner walk right by
Swing the next one by and by
Then promenade that lady home

Action - twice for heads - twice for sides

A1:Heads forward and back; sides forward and back.  All four ladies chain (across the music)
A2:Finish the chain.  Swing this one.
B1:Head ladies chain to the right.  Swing this one.
B2:Heads pass through, separate, around two people to the end of side lines (close to where you started this move).
A3:Lines forward and back.  Ladies cross over to meet original corner with a left allemande — all end facing partner in home place.
A4:Grand chain half-way, and one more change to pass partner by.
B3:Swing the next (original right-hand lady).
B4:Promenade to the gent's place.

I think that's how I would phrase it to the music, so twice through a 32-bar tune is once through the figure, but you can always cut down the length of the swing in B3 or add another swing at the end of B4 if it's not going to fit — just call it with conviction and the dancers will follow your lead.



Volume 6

Three French-Canadian figures        Print this danceTop of page   Updated 17-Oct-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 1, December 1957.  Original wording on page 9    Internet Archive

by TOM LENTHALL


On visiting a new city I usually try to find out what there is available in the line of square dancing.  The public transportation consulting company for which I work sent me recently to Cleveland, Ohio, where I met an interesting old-timer, H, Ben Goedicke.

Mr Goedicke is a Canadian gentleman who has the rather odd idea (odd in Cleveland at least) that square dance music is to he danced to and that Honolulu Baby and similar concoctions are not to be danced to.  Ben, as I gathered, learned to call early in his youth while living in Canada, and many of his calls have been handed down to him by other Canadian callers.

I copied down, and had him explain to me, three French-Canadian figures (Grand Moulinet, Dosse Ballinet, and Tirior) and two contras…

These figures are as Ben and I reconstructed from his manuscripts :-

GRAND MOULINET

In this figure all the dancers move.

Ladies to the center with a left hand star halfway - 4 bars.
At the same time the gents move to their left halfway.
Gents join right hands with their partners and balance twice - 2 bars.
Ladies turn out and the gents turn in - 2 bars.
Gents go back to place with a right hand star while the ladies walk home - 4 bars.
Join Hands, do a two hand turn to place - 4 bars.

TIRIOR

Sashay - 4 bars - between the opposite couple.
Turn separately and promenade back to place.
At the same time the other couple promenade over and sashay back.

DOSSE BALLINET - l6 bars

Head four lead to the right - 4 bars
Dosse ballinet - 4 bars - pass through other couple - 2 bars, gent face in, lady face out, two gents balance - 2 bars - turn right hand lady around so that both are facing in (face other couple) right and left to place - 4 bars.

I don't think the first two need to be explained.  The second is similar to the move in A3 of La Russe.

What do we make of “gent face in, lady face out, two gents balance”?  I think it's another form of do-si-do, which I've seen in Running Set, so my guess is that you form what would now be called an Alamo ring: all take hands, men facing in, men facing out.  He says “two gents balance” but maybe that's because they're facing in so they can balance forward and back towards each other; I'd expect the ladies to balance facing out.  The gent's right-hand lady is his opposite, but the instructions say “face other couple” so surely the men must turn their partners by the left half-way — that's the men passing “back to back” which is what “dos a dos” means.  And then there's time for another balance, or maybe two bars for the ladies to turn round and face in.  You may think I'm just making all this up, but often there are moves implied but not mentioned in the instructions because “everybody knows that”!

When I got to Three Ladies Chain in Volume 6 I found a clear description of the Do si Ballonet (yet another spelling), so here's my revised interpretation:

A:Heads lead out to the right and form a ring with that side couple; circle left half-way.  Give right hand to your opposite and gents hand the ladies across to the other lady's place to form a ring with gents facing in, ladies facing out; all balance forward and back.
B:Ladies hand partner across to the other gent's place; all balance forward and back.  Gents about turn to your left to face opposite, and do a right and left through.

This leaves the ones on the outside and the twos in the middle of the set so I assume they promenade rapidly round each other for the heads to repeat the figure with the other side couple.  But I could be completely wrong!  My previous interpretation got the twos home and the ones in the middle, so maybe it really is a different version of the Do si ballonet.

All American Hash        Print this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 1, December 1957.  Original wording on page 28    Internet Archive

As called by “Duke” Miller

Music: Any reel or breakdown you wish.  Introduction, break and ending - ad lib.

Head couples out to the right
And circle just half way round
Duck through - pass through - right and left through
Duck through - pass through - right and left through
Duck through - two ladies chain in the center of the floor
Turn and chain the outside four
Chain back, chain in the center
Put your own on your right
And circle four in the center of the floor
Four hands round and round you go
Break it up with a do pas o
Partner left, opposite right
Partner left and sides cut in
With a right hand around
Partner left and catch your corner
Promenade her and don't step on 'er.

Once more for heads - then twice for the sides
I'm not going to try and fit this into 8-bar A's and B's; it really is called unphrased.  Just a few points.

“Duck through” is what we now call “Dive through” — the insides arch, all move forwards, the outsides dive through and those making the arch — in this case the sides — do a California twirl to face back into the set with the gent still on the left.  Same again to get the heads back to the side where they started.  The heads dive through a third time and do a ladies chain in the middle with a power turn to face the nearer side couple. With the outside two chain over and back, heads finishing the chain back with a power turn to face the other head couple.  Head ladies chain to their own partner, and I don't see the need for “Put your own on your right” — she should already be there, so maybe it's just confirmation that the heads are indeed back with their partner.  After circling left the heads do a Do Paso — left-hand turn partner and the gents cross to right-hand turn the other lady, then cross back to left-hand turn partner enough to face the nearer side couple, with the gent on the left.  But this means the first couple are facing the second couple — so the first lady is facing her corner but the first gent isn't.

Once again Tony Parkes clarified things for me.

I can't blame you for assuming that “sides cut in” after the do paso refers to the side couple that the head couple was just working with.  But with my knowledge (some of it firsthand) of Duke, Ralph, and similar dances of the 1950s, I'm virtually certain that Duke meant the call to be interpreted in a different way.

I believe that in order for the dance to work out as Duke intended, the heads need to start the do paso when their backs are to their own home position, which would mean circling once and a quarter (or twice and a quarter, etc.).  Then “sides cut in” would mean that each side person turns his or her original corner by the right hand as the corner comes out of the last “partner left” of the do paso.  This will yield a normal corner progression.

Granted, the circle once and a quarter is not specified.  But there were a lot of non-directive calls in those days, and walkthroughs were much more common, even in “western style,” than they would become a decade later.

So here's my understanding:

 Heads lead to the right and circle left half-way.
 “Dive through”: Insides (sides) arch, outsides dive through and the archers do a California twirl to face in with the gent on the left.
 Middles (heads) pass through and do a right and left through with the other outside couple.
 Again dive through, pass through, right and left through.
 Dive through, so heads are facing the other head couple and you're all with your partner.
 Ladies chain over, with a power turn to face the outside two.
 Ladies chain with the outside two.  Chain back, and the middles (heads) do a power turn to face the other head couple.
 Ladies chain — now you're all back with your partner (where you were the last time you were together).
 Middles circle left 1¼ — all home.
 Middles do paso: partner left, men cross right, opposite left, men cross left, partner right, so middles have your back to your partner, facing your corner.
 Right-hand turn corner, left-hand turn partner.  Promenade corner to man's place.
 Repeat the figure for the heads, then twice for the sides.

Do si do and face the sides        Print this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 2, February 1958.  Original wording on page 32    Internet Archive


Any good fiddle time

As called by Rod Linnell

The two head couples go forward and back
Then with the opposite do si do
Men turn left, ladies right,
Face the sides and circle left
You circle once around
Then pass through and around just one
You're standing four in line
Forward all and back like that
The middle four make a right hand star
Just once around you go
Now turn your corner by the left hand
Turn once and a half around
Then you stay there in your corner's place
Corners to the center with a right hand star
Just once around you go
Then balance corners all around
And swing your corner round and round
Promenade that corner once around the ring

Repeat once more for new head couples;
Then twice for side couples

Introduction - breaks - ending - ad lib.

This was later published in Ted Sannella's book “Balance and Swing”.  It's a 48-bar figure, so if you're OK improvising a 48-bar introduction, break and ending you'll need 7 x 48-bar reels or jigs.  If not, or the band aren't happy playing 48 bars, I suggest 9 x 32-bar reels or jigs, with a 32-bar introduction, break and ending, and don't worry that the second and fourth times through the figure will start on the B-music.

Special Maritimes issue

Vol. 6, No. 3

This “Dances of the Maritimes” issue of the Junket is a trial at something different.  Certainly no one can truthfully say that there are not enough dances in this particular issue.

It is not intended to be a complete treatise of the subject .  Far from it.  If we'd had that intention in mind we surely would have included some of the older Scottish dances, remnants and variants of which can still be found in many parts of the provinces.

We have tried to give a fair picture of the dances you might meet up with should you have the good fortune of dancing with a Maritime group anywhere in that area of Canada.  I suppose that you might call them ' survival dances '.

A “polka quadrille” is danced in some form or another everywhere you go and to a slightly lesser degree, a “waltz quadrille”; many times the figures of the two are interchangeable, merely the tempo being different.

The region is blessed with having many outstanding fiddlers and orchestras, the best known probably being Don Messer & His Islanders.

My heartfelt thanks to the people who helped with this issue, especially to Rod Linnell, Norman MacBurnie, & Maurice Hennigar.

I hope to do something similar next month with the “Dances of Quebec”.

Sincerely
Ralph

Note: Canada's four maritime provinces are New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland.

Waltz Quadrille        Print this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 3, March 1958.  Original wording on page 11    Internet Archive

I may add the  tunes later.


Lantz, N.S.

Any basic waltz tune is used, a different tune for each figure.  4 examples given. 4 couples per square - may be done with any even number of couples.

Figure 1.

Half right and left on the heads (weave)*
Heads waltz across and back
Half right and left back to place
Everyone waltz once around the set (“Everyone waltz everyone dance”).

Repeat with side couples

*   This is like a “cross trail through” except that there is a weaving pattern as the couples cross over, ladies precede the gents slightly and pass right shoulders, the gents cut between the opposite couple and pass left shoulders.  Each ends up on his correct side and no turn as a couple is necessary.

Figure 2.

1st lady and opposite gent forward and circle two (The expression “four hands around” is used here).
All waltz once around the set

Repeat for 2nd, 3rd & 4th lady and opposite gents

Note: 2nd lady is opposite 1st gent; 3rd is on right of 1st couple; 4th is on left of 1st couple.

Figure 3 .

All join and pass partner to gent on the right (The expression “all huddle” is used here).
All waltz once around the set
Repeat three more times

Note: When doing this figure in a large square cut it off with a grand chain and promenade

Figure 4.

Right hand to corner. Left hand to partner (allemande R & L)
All waltz once around the set

Repeat three more times

Finish with a grand chain and waltz to place

Formerly five figures were included in this dance
Figure 4 was -
Grand chain half way, meet partner and waltz
1st couple waltz inside the set
All waltz once around the set

Repeat all for 2nd, 3rd & 4th couples inside

Atlantic Polka Quadrille        Print this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 3, March 1958.  Original wording on page 19    Internet Archive


Arranged by Rod Linnell from information gathered in the Maritimes, principally from New Brunswick.

Steps - Heel & Toe Polka
Gents begin on left foot; lady begins on right foot.

Steps in Heel & Toe Polka

Directions for men, ladies opposite

counts
Place left heel on floor out to side1
Place left toe on floor across in front of right foot      2
Step sideward left1
Bring right foot to left and take weight2
Step sideward left1
Hold2
 
1st Figure: Music: Atlantic Polka Quadrille, 1st change
Intro: Honor Partners (4) Honor Corners (4)

All polka once around the set (8)

Figure.
Heads right and left four (8)
Heel & Toe partners (4) holding left hands (turn once around to right)
Heads polka inside the set (8)
Heel & Toe corners once around (4) hold L hands
All polka with partners once around the set (8)

Repeat for sides - heads - sides.

2nd Change: Music “Atlantic Polka Quadrille” 2nd change
“Waltz In Figure”.

Intro: Honor partners (4) Honor Corners (4)

All heel & toe to centre and back twice (8)
All polka once around the set (3)

Figure:
Gent #1 change partners (8) Gent 1 dances with his lady to gent 2, leaves his lady there and takes #2 lady to gent 3, leaves her, takes #3 lady to gent 4, leaves her and takes #4 lady back to his original place.  Gents 2, 3, and 4, in turn, make a small circle CCW inside the set to get out of gent 1's way as he comes to each of their partners.  This sounds much more
complicated than it really is.
A.. Ladies right hand star half way (4)
B-. All heel & toe to centre and back twice (8)

Repeat A & B

Repeat for gents # 2, # 3, & #4.

3rd Change - Music “Little Brown Jug”
Social dance position “Half Moon Figure”

All heel & toe partner once around (8)
(facing centre of set, man shifts partner to his left side on 1st h & t step; back to right on 2nd)
Heads heel & toe to centre and back twice (8)
Heads polka once around the inside of the set (8)
Repeat for sides-heads-sides

4th Change - Music: “Jenny Lind's Favorite Polka”
“Show Off Partner”

Ladies right hand star. Gents link onto ladies' L elbows.  All go once around CW (8)
All heel & toe to centre and back twice (8)

Gent # 1 show off partner (8)
1st couple polka inside the set (8)
All polka once around the set (8)

Repeat for gents # 2, # 3, # 4

5th Change Music: “Jingle Bells”

Intro: A- Promenade halfway round to the left, then back to the right, ladies inside (8)
B. Gents turn corners once around with right elbow linked (polka steps) next once around with left elbows linked, and so on until they meet their own partner half way round the set.
C. All polka home, both figures takes l6 meas.
D,1 - Ladies right hand star, gents link on (8)
Repeat B & C
D,2 -Gents left hand star, ladies link on (8)
Repeat B - C - D,l (24)
Repeat B - C - D,2 (24) .
Elbow turns complete circle, start corner right (32)
All polka (8) Note: 4 polka steps on each elbow turn

This strikes me as much more like an Irish Set Dance (which derives from the 19th century quadrilles) than an American square.  I may try and explain it later!

Big Square From Prince Edward Island        Print this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 3, March 1958.  Original wording on page 26    Internet Archive

As done in P.E.I, and called by Rae Simmons who is MC for Don Messer and His Islanders.
Courtesy of Rod Linnell.

Formation: Large square. Any number of couples on a side.  Each couple must be facing another couple. The larger number of couples, if necessary, is on the heads; smaller number on the sides.

Music: Any fast square dance music. The relationship between the steps and the music is quite casual.  The time required for each figure depends upon the vigor of the dancers.

1st Figure: Calls underlined

      Head couples go forward and back. (Sometimes it's a long way forward but they drop back to dancing position as in our squares).
      Forward again and swing four hands.  (Swing the opposite lady).
      First couple up centre on the outside returning.  (This is our “right & left four” done in the following manner - all move forward, couples #1 going under arch made by couples #3 - turn as a couple - and on return #1's make the arch over #3's and both couples continue forward to place in big set, and turn there as a couple.)
      Salute your partner.
      Swing your corner (leave her on the left).

Same for sides - heads - sides: then

      Grand change (rt & lft) meet partner, promenade home & swing.

2nd Figure:

      Ladies on the inside.  (This call means form a basket & circle left).
      Now up and over. (Gents drop back and form a ring on the outside).
      Gents to the right and ladies to the left.  (Circle)
      Meet your partner and promenade.

Repeat entire sequence but move everything to the left - that would be after the 'up and over', gents to the left and ladies to the right.

      Grand change.
      Meet partner and promenade home.
      Swing (Partner)

3rd Figure:

      All hands in.  (Sometimes called “all join” and sometimes “all huddle”).
      Swing the lady on your left.
      Promenade that same girl.  (Repeat above action at will, sometimes varying call by “Swing the girl behind you - promenade her - Grand change - meet partner and promenade home - swing partner.” )

Repeat entire sequence as many times as caller desires.  Usually about five or six times.

4th Figure:

      Grand change
      Promenade Indian style
      Swing the girl behind you
      Grand change (halfway round)
      Swing partners
      Promenade partners

In small square of less than 20 couples this figure can be repeated.  Note: I have seen it done with over 50 couples !

Method of doing “Grand change” in P.E.I.

Right hand to partner and grand right and left.  Ladies are the only ones who progress around the circle.  Men stand in place and execute step dance.  Lady gives man right hand and step dances a couple of measures in place and then turns under his arm CCW, on her own initiative.  Man never twirls her.  She continues to the next with left hand and after proper exchange of steps with him, turns under his arm CW and continues in this manner until she returns to her original partner.

Note: After the first figure, the Big Square is done in a circle formation, and extra couples join in at will.  I have seen this dance done many times on P.E.I, in different places, but always the same.  A different tune is used for each figure.  The entire dance takes 20 to 30 minutes to do, depending on the size of the square.

Polka Quadrille        Print this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 3, March 1958.  Original wording on page 32    Internet Archive

Formation : “Big Set”, any number of couples standing in an enlarged square.

Music: Any polka rhythm

1st Figure:

      Half right and left on the heads
      Swing partner
      Half right and left back
      Heads polka ( once around the inside of the square holding relative positions throughout)
      Everybody polka (all polka in a circle to places)

Repeat all with side couples

2nd Figure:

      First lady & opposite gent forward and back
      Forward and swing 4 (really 2) hands around (Circle with crossed hands).
      Heads polka
      Everybody polka

Repeat with second lady & opposite gent, etc.

3rd Figure:

      All huddle and pass the lady on (All join hands and swing joined hands forward and back releasing partner' s hand and taking corner).
      All polka

Repeat until all are back to places, or if a large set do a grand change after a few changes until original partners meet, then polka home.

4th Figure:

      Grand change half way
      Polka to places
      First couple(s) polka inside (the square)
      Everybody polka

Repeat with 2nd, 3rd, & 4th couples inside.

5th Figure:

      Grand change all the way
      Everybody polka (once around).

Repeat three more times

Note: The same figures are also done in waltz tempo.

Glossary of French Canadian Calls & Figures        Print this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 4, May 1958.  Original wording on page 15    Internet Archive

True to his word, Ralph has included a lot of information about dances and songs (and other stuff) from Quebec.  He also included the following glossary.

GLOSSAIRE D£ CALLS ET FIGURES

Ce GLOSSAISE est forcement incomplet.  Mais nous croyons q'il est essentiel.

Translated from QUES'KIA # 9-10

BALANCER   (Balance. Set to partner.)

Inactive couples take steps together from right to left in place, in order not to lose the rhythm of the dance and to show interest toward those who are dancing (actives) during this time.  With the call “Tout le monde balance et…” face partner, extend right hand to her and take some fanciful steps, or step on right foot, swing left over right, step on left foot, swing right over left.  These steps are by way of bowing and introducing ones partner.

CHAINE DES DAMES   (square dance)
The lady dancer gives her right hand to the opposite lady and places her left hand in the left hand of the man who places his right hand around the waist of the lady dancer, has her turn around him in order to have her return to the inside of the set.  The lady dancers return to their partners in the same manner.

CHAINE DES DAMES   (a 4 personnes) (for 4 persons)
Same as American “Ladies grand chain”.

CHAINE DES DAMES   (dans le quadrille)
The designated ladies pass through the dance (group) using steps together.  They make a turn of the opposite gentleman, bow to him (often by balancing) and recross through the dance in order to return to their places.

CHANGER DE COTE   (Changing direction)
When the couples proceed “SCH” (CCW) around the dance at the call “changer de cote”, they pivot inwardly - toward the inside of the couple - so that the gentleman is still on the inside of the circle and the lady on the outside..

CROCHET (AU GAUCHE OU DROIT)   Reel by the left or right.  Reel partner or lady or gentleman designated once around by the right or left elbow.

DEMI TOUR (FAIRE UN) (Make a half turn)
Change direction so as to retrace one's steps.

ETOILE (MOULINET, CROIX)   Star
Same as American “star” figure.

FEMMES AU MILIEU, HOMMES AUTOUR   (Ladies in the middle men outside.)
The lady dancers stand with their backs to the center and the men turn around them CCW using marching steps in unison.

GRANDE CHAINE   Large chain (American style, sometimes Canadien).
Partners face each other, give their right hand to each other, pass to the next giving the left hand and to the following dancer, giving right hand etc. NOTE.  The “large chain” is always made in the same direction, that is to say, the men move CCW and the ladies move CW, unless the opposite is explicitly asked for by a call.

GRANDE CHAINE   (Americain, quelquefois Canadien)
Left hand to your corner, turn with her and continue the large chain until you meet your partner.  In square dances when having returned to the station opposite you meet your partner again, you take her back to your home position in Varsouvienne position.
(Canadien) When you meet your partner, you bow and continue the chain until back to your home position.

MAIN GAUCHE AU COIN   (left hand to the corner)
Give your left hand to your corner, walk around this corner lady in order to return to your partner and give her your right hand, for this call is usually followed by “Right hand to partner”.

A LA MAIN GAUCHE - A LA MAIN DROIT
Simply give the hand designated to the person with whom one is to dance.

ET DES DEUX MAINS   (and with both hands)
Give both hands to the designated person and walk around each other CW and once again CCW.

PASSEZ DESSOUS   (Pass beneath)
The person or the couple designated pass beneath the arch formed by the raised hands of one or several couples.

PASSE DES DAMES   (ou des hommes) (ladies pass, or men)
This is done as the “chain” from which it comes.  The ladies change places without touching each other's hands.  One usually executes this figure again in order to return to original position.  Same thing for the men.

PASSER ENTRE   (Pass between)
The two couples come face to face.  Partners let go each other's hands and pass through between the opposite couple, in such a way that the ladies pass on the inside, and the gentlemen on the outside.

PASSEZ TOUT DROIT   (Pass straight ahead)
Call that is given when one desires to have a figure continue when normally it should end.

PIVOTER   (Pivot, wheel, change direction)
The working couple has taken station on the opposite side.  The gentleman gives his hand to his partner and turns half way around by turning to his left.  The lady follows so as to be stationed to the right of the man.  (Same as an American “courtesy turn”.)

PRESENTER (Present)
The couples in question advance toward the center quickly, bow and move back to their stations more quickly.

PROMENEZ-VOUS - Like American “Promenade home”.

REFOULANT (EN)
All take hold of hands and advance to the center, bow and return to place.  This figure is done in 8 steps.  In Canadian dances, this is the only figure which is done with marching steps.

QUEUE DE LOUP   (The Wolf's Tail)
All join hands facing the center.  The gentleman of the number 1 couple detaches himself from the number 4 couple, lifts his right arm in order to form an arch with his partner, passes beneath this arch.  He returns toward the inside of the dance, passes beneath the arch formed between his partner and the gentleman of the number 2 couple, returns toward the inside… until the end.

LA ROUE   (The wheel)
The couple stands face to face, lady and gentleman hold hands.  The gentleman extends his arms horizontally; raise the left arm and lower the right arm so that they are parallel, the body bent toward the left.  The gentleman makes a complete turn with his arms, his body swings (pivots) and the couple returns face to face.  The figure is done again in the opposite direction.

SALUER   (Bow, salute)
The gentleman turns toward his partner, nods his head while bending his body very slightly.  The lady, upon looking at her partner, slightly bends one leg backward.

TRAVERSEZ DE L'AUTRE COTE   (Cross from the other side)
Go to the position occupied by the opposite couple, either by passing between this couple, or by passing to the side of one or the other.

Set de St. Adele        Print this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 4, May 1958.  Original wording on page 23    Internet Archive

Part 1 - The Presentation

First man walks across the set to third lady, salute, turn around, comes back to his place, balance and swings his lady
Men 2, 3, & 4 do the same figure.

Part 2 - The Visit

Couples 1 and 3 present and exchange places.
Same couples present again and return to places .  Each time they bow as they pass by.
Couples 2 & 4 do the same figure.

Part 3 - The Cheat

First man balances lady 2 but swings partner, then balances lady 3, but swings lady 2; then balances lady 4 but swings lady 3; then balances lady 1, but swings lady 4.
Men 2, 3, & 4 do the same figure.

Part 4 -The Breakdown

Swing your own, put your lady in the center and gents walk around outside the ring to the right.  Swing the lady next to yours and put her in the center.  Repeat until you swing your original partner.

Michel says: “This dance was taught to me by M. Page of St. Adele, P.Q. who learned it from his father. You will have to use an LP record unless you have a violinist in your group.  I suggest MH Glisa a Sherbrooke”.

There's a Glossary of French Canadian Calls & Figures which explains that “present” means “advance towards the center quickly, bow and move back to their stations more quickly”.

La Gigeuse        Print this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 4, May 1958.  Original wording on page 24    Internet Archive

Everybody swing partners.
Gents turn your lady around you with your right hand holding her left hand, over your head, and direct her to the center of the set.
Gents walk around the set in 16 steps.
Bow to your partner and stand in front of the next one.
Men dance 8 jig steps.
Ladies now respond with 8 jig steps.
Ladies chain: Gents turn the lady facing you by your right hand over your head and direct her to the center to form a right hand star and chain to opposite man (ladies grand chain) and come home again with another right hand star.  Gents turn the lady around you with right hand again.
Repeat until you come back home again.
Then all swing partner once more .

Note: La Gigeuse is a “Coquette” or “Breakdown”.  This kind of a dance, which comes after two sets always finishes “une danse caree”.  So there are no calls, and the music is a fast tempo.

“une danse carrée” just means “a square dance”, and I don't see how a “Coquette” (which means a flirtatious woman) can also mean “Breakdown”.  I don't know what “Gigeuse” means either!

Set des Jaloux        Print this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 4, May 1958.  Original wording on page 24    Internet Archive

 
Saguenay, P.Q.

Couple 1 present and swing.

Man 1 balances his partner and swings the next and brings her back to his place and stands her beside his partner.  He does the same with the other ladies, so that all four are standing in a line in his place.

They join hands and circle five hands around to the left and back to place.

Man 1 balances his lady then promenades lady 2 back to her place.  The same for the others.

Men 2, 3, & 4 do the same figure.

All promenade once around and swing partner in place

La Gigue a 8        Print this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 4, May 1958.  Original wording on page 25    Internet Archive

Old cotillion of 1860 danced at Val Morin, P.Q.

1st & 3rd couples present
2nd & 4th couples present
Ladies right hand star once around
Left hand star back to place
All couples chassez one place to the right
Everybody swing (small one)
Men right hand star once around
Left hand star back to place
All chassez one place to the right
Everybody swing (small one)

Repeat dance three more times.

Set Rustic        Print this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 4, May 1958.  Original wording on page 25    Internet Archive

Montreal

1st version:
All couples march around the hall
All swing partners
All promenade the other way
All in to the center
Ladies present; men present and swing the other (lady on your left.  Sometimes, swing the girl in front of you.)

2nd version:
Ladies join hands and circle left and to the right. At the same time the men join hands and circle right and to the left.

3rd version:

Men join hands and lift them in an arch.
The ladies walk under the arch.  All swing.  Then ladies make an arch and the men walk under the arch to partners.  All swing partners.

4th version:
When promenading the lead couple go under a bridge formed by the other dancers, others follow in turn.  Separate the two lines, men in one, ladies in the other.  All forward, and turn partner once around by the left hand, then once around by the right hand; left elbow reel partners; right elbow reel partners; all back to back (dos a dos); all swing partners and all promenade.

La Cardeuse        Print this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 4, May 1958.  Original wording on page 20    Internet Archive

(from Sagueny Region, P.Q.)

This dance seems to be best known in the region of Lake St. John.  As given here it is just as described by Mr Begin of Jonquiere.

Music recommended: “Branpton Breakdown”.

Le Cardage (carding, i.e. as of wool) This figure is a double galop.  The couples face each other while holding both hands.
The uneven couples (head couples) 4 chassez steps to the center.
4 chassez steps back to place.
8 chassez steps across the set to opposite place, men passing back to back.
4 chassez steps to the center
4 chassez steps back to place
8 chassez steps across to your own place.

The even couples (side couples) do the same

Here is the dance.

1.  Le cardage
2  Men right hand star, circle with 8 marching steps then left hand star back to place with 8 steps.
3.  Le cardage
4.  Ladies right hand star, circle with 8 marching steps then left hand star back to place with 8 steps.
5.  Le cardage
6.  The men join hands and circle four hands round to the left 8 marching steps, then back to the right.  This figure is sometimes called “the four black hands”.
7.  Le cardage
8.  The ladies join hands and circle four hands around to the left with 8 marching steps then back to the right. This figure is sometimes called “the -four white hands”.
9.  All swing partners.  The gentlemen swings each lady twice in turn.

Repeat entire dance if desired.

This must surely come from a 19th century Cotillion where you have a Figure (in this case “Le cardage”) and a number of Changes which you do after each occurrence of the Figure.

La Favorite de Montreal        Print this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 4, May 1958.  Original wording on page 35    Internet Archive

Square by Rod LaFarge

First couple forward and back
Couples one and two right and left over and back
Same ladies chain and swing
Chain back and swing your own
On to the next, right and left over and back
Same ladies chain and swing
Chain back and swing your own
Compagnie - right and left over and back (couple 1 with 4, couple 2 with 3)
Same ladies chain and swing
Promenade all around the hall (not with your partner)
Ladies chain back, swing your own

After chorus figure, repeat figure for other couples.

Set Salle St. Denis        Print this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 4, May 1958.  Original wording on page 36    Internet Archive

Square by Rod LaFarge

First couple forward and back
Forward again and cut off six   (1st couple go between 3rd and separate, man to right, lady to left, around the outside back to place)
Pass the lady around   (1st couple face 2nd couple.  Lady 1 gives right hand to man 2 who places his left hand on small of her back and turns her once around CW as in a ladies chain, passing her back to man 1 who joining left hands with her turns her around in the same manner CCW.  Lady 2 remains idle.  First couple now repeat this with other two couples in turn.)
Swing in the center, six hands around
All swing corners
All promenade home (with new partner)
Forward up and cut away four   (man to the right, lady to the left)
Pass the lady around
Swing in the center, six hands around
All swing corners
All promenade home (with new partner)
Forward up and cut away two
Pass the lady around
Swing in the center, six hands around
All swing corners
All promenade home
All swing your own
After chorus figure repeat figure for other couples.

Set Salle St. Andre        Print this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 4, May 1958.  Original wording on page 37    Internet Archive

Square by Rod LaFarge

First couple forward and back
Forward up and cut away six (as in previous dance)
Three by three (called three times)   (Man 1 joins hands with couple 4 to form a circle of three; lady 1 forms a similar circle with the 2nd couple.  These 2 units circle left at the same time revolving about each other CCW in such a manner as to progress around the inside of the set.  This ''circling of threes'' is now repeated twice as follows: once by man 1 with couple 2 and lady 1 with couple 3, then once by man 1 with couple 3 and lady 1 with couple 4.)
Four by four   (lady 1 stays with couple 4 while man 1 joins this trio - on his partner's left - to form a circle of four.  Couples 3 and 2 join hands to form similar circle.  These two circles now turn and rotate about each other just as the circles of 3 did.)
Right and left over and back   (couple 1 with 4, couple 2 with 3)
Same ladies chain and swing
All promenade (with girl you were swinging)
Chain back and swing your own.

After chorus figure repeat figure for other couples.

I know the “Three by three” and “Four by four” figure as the “Bouquet Waltz”, but traditional figures can have many names.

Strawberries and Raspberries        Strawberries and Raspberries: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 1-Sep-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 5, July 1958.  Original wording on page 27    Internet Archive

A medley as called by Mal Hayden, Rochester, N.H.

Fig.1. - Adapted from Ed Gilmore's “Lady Be Good”

Two head couples right hand star
Go once around the ring
Allemande left your corner
And the two head couples swing
Two side couples right hand star
Go once around the ring
Allemande left your corner
And a right hand round your own
Oh you swing the corner girl, swing your corners all
And after you have swung her
Promenade her round the hall
(Sing) Oh! Les fraises et les framboises,
La la la la la la la etc.

Fig. 2. - Abe Kanegson's original

Two head couples circle 4, once around'll do
A quarter more and balance, and pass right through
With the couple you meet you right and left four
Then right and left back home
Right and left right back to place
And honor to your own
Now your comer dosido, and dosido your own
And take your comer lady
Promenade that lady home
(Sing) Oh! Les fraises et les framboises, etc.

Repeat all of Figures 1 & 2 for the side couples.

The Crooked Stovepipe        Crooked Stovepipe: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 17-Oct-22

Volume 6 Number 6 was again a special edition — this time of dances from Ontario, Canada, including a number of squares.

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1958.  Original wording on page 10    Internet Archive

Music - The Crooked Stovepipe.  See v1,n3 Northern Junket for music and a similar version dance

Introduction - Your choice

Figure:

The head two ladies forward and back
Forward again, two ladies swing
Six hands round in a great big ring
Break that ring and swing your own
Roll her a little, roll her a lot
It's allemande left with the corners all
Allemande right with your own
Do si do with the corners all
Do the same with your own
Allemande left with the corners all
And swing your own as you come around

Repeat for side two ladies
Repeat for head two gents
Repeat for side two gents

This is indeed virtually the same as the version given earlier.

The Haystack        Fiddlers Three: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 17-Oct-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1958.  Original wording on page 11    Internet Archive

as called by Wes McVicar
Suggested music: Fiddlers Three

Part 1.
 Head two couples lead to the right
With a right hand star
Go back with the left
And there you are

* Now a right to the lady behind your back
And a left to your own and take her home
Allemande left with your corners all
Grand right and left around the hall
When you get home now what do you do?
You swing her and she'll swing you.

Repeat with side couples

Part 2.
Ladies to the center back to back
Gents go round the old haystack
Ladies step out (back to place)
The gents cut in and balance to the next
All swing the same

Repeat until back with own partner

* Gents turn left about and do an allemande right with the opposite.  Give left hand back to partner and lead to place

When gents walk around the ladies it is with 16 two-steps.

Here's my understanding of the two figures.

Part 1:
A1:Heads lead out to the right to face that side couple (head couples back to back in the middle): Right-hand star.  Left-hand star, and the heads face away from the star to the other head couple.
A2:Heads right-hand turn opposite.  Give left hand to partner and the gent lead your lady back to place in the square.
B1+2:Allemande left corner, grand chain all the way round the square, quick swing at home.
 Sides repeat the figure.
Part 1:
A1:Ladies to the centre, acknowledge, then about turn to face out.  Men go single file to the right round the ladies (acknowledging each as you pass).
A2:Men continue the single file to home place.  As ladies step out to home place, men go past your partner to meet the next.
B1:Balance and swing this new partner.
B2:(added):  Promenade once around, to the lady's place.
 Repeat three more times to get the men home.

The men's single file is danced with a two-step, which I consider to be a Pas de bas (or with a push on the up-beat, a Skip-change step).

You could do the balance at the end of A2 and then have an 8-bar swing as B1.  As I see it, the figure is only 24 bars, so I've added a promenade.  Admittedly if you did the figure four times you would finish at the end of three times through the tune, but that would be so across the music that I would feel uncomfortable dancing it that way.

Little Brown Jug        Little Brown Jug: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 17-Oct-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1958.  Original wording on page 13    Internet Archive

As called by Paddy Geddes - Fergus
Music - Little Brown Jug
Intro:- Your choice

Figure:

First couple and balance there
Chassee by - address your opposite
Chassee back - address your own
Turn. your opposite half around
Then the one you call your own
Now turn your opposite once again
And promenade your own
To the next and balance there
Chassee by etc. etc.

Repeat with each couple. Use any break desired

Note: On the “chassee by” the gents pass behind their partners, stepping to the right behind their partners, while the ladies slip in front, to the left.  On the “address your opposite” they bow to each other.

I think there's a word missing: it should be “First couple right and balance there”.  And the original song didn't have any B-music: www.youtube.com/watch?v=07T7rREzYMc so the figure need not be 32 bars.  I still wasn't sure how to fit it to the music, but then I found the page www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/ discover/films-videos-sound-recordings/virtual-gramophone/ Pages/ Item.aspx?idNumber=1033761206 which has a link to an MP3 recording at www.collectionscanada.ca/ obj/m2/f7/16469.mp3 (though they say they're moving to a new site so this may no longer work) so now I'm more confident.  And indeed the recording uses the B-music I've given, though George Wade doesn't fit his call to the A's and B's.

A1:First couple lead out to the right to face the second couple; both couples balance.  Chassée to change places with partner (man behind lady) quick bow to opposite; chassée back (again man behind lady); quick bow to partner.
A2:Two-hand turn opposite half-way; two-hand turn partner half-way.  Turn opposite half-way which leaves you all in your partner's place, and I'm guessing that there's another turn partner half-way to get you back to where you were for the balance, ready for the first couple to lead on to the third couple and repeat the figure, then to the fourth couple..

Go Through and Chain        My Love She's But a Lassie Yet: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 17-Oct-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1958.  Original wording on page 13    Internet Archive

As called by Paddy Geddes
Suggested music: My love is but a lassie yet

Intro:
Honour your corner
Your partners address
Then all join hands
Away to the west
Now stop right there
And give her a swing
Then promenade home around the ring

Figure:
Head two couples go forward and back
Go forward again - take your opposite
And right and left through on the sides
And right and left back
Chain again with the outside lady
And chain right back
Now the head two a half promenade
Then circle four in the centre of the floor
And take your lady home

It's allemande left your corner girl
And allemande right your own
And promenade your corner girl
And swing when you. get home.

Repeat once more for the head couples
Repeat twice more for the side couples
Intro:
A:Honour corner; honour partner.  Circle left half-way.
B:Swing partner.  Promenade home.
Figure:
A1:Heads lead forward and back.  Forward again and swing opposite (swing added) — finish facing the nearer side couple.
A2:Right and left through.  And back.
B1:Ladies chain.  And back.
B2:Heads wheel around and half promenade to finish in each other's place.  Circle left half-way and fall back to place.
A3:Allemande left corner, allemande right partner, promenade corner.
B3:Finish the promenade to the man's place.  Swing new partner.
 Repeat for heads, then twice for sides.

Three Ladies Chain        Print this danceTop of page   Added 17-Oct-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1958.  Original wording on page 15    Internet Archive

As called by Wes McVicar

Intro: Your choice

Figure:

First couple lead to the right
Circle half with all your might
Go right and left four, right and left six
Three couples travel, don't get mixed
Cross right over, cross right back
Three couples on the same old track
Balance to the couple you meet (couple 1 facing couple 4 for the second time)
Three ladies chain, three ladies chain
All three ladies down the lane
Meet your own and lead to the next
Join your hands and circle a half
And the ladies Do si Ballonet
Gents in the river, don't get wet
Complete the Do si Ballonet
Break with the left, turn with the right
Take your own and lead right on

Explanation:

When they meet the fourth couple substitute a 4 couple swing for the Do si Ballonet

The Do si Ballonet:  Two couples are active.  Join 4 hands, circle a half.  Gents take the opposite lady's right hand in right.  The two ladies cross the circle and rejoin hands in a circle of four.  Ladies are now facing out, the gents in.  All balance forward and back.  Gents break with the right hand, cross the circle and rejoin hands.  At the same time ladies turn in.  Gents now face out.  Balance again.  Gents break with the left.  Two couples do a right and left chain turning partners as in the ladies chain.  On the balance, a “tap step” is frequently used.

Here's what I make of all this.

A1:Ones lead to the right; circle with the twos half-way, so the ones, twos and fours are in a column across the hall.  Start a “right and left six”: the ones and twos do (half) a right and left through, but instead of the ones doing a courtesy turn they move on to do a right and left through with the fours…
A2:and this continues until the twos and fours are home and the ones are facing the fours — and I'm guessing (without having tried it with real people) that at the end of the musical phrase the ones and fours join hands in a ring and balance.
B1:“Three ladies chain”: Ones and fours do a ladies chain but the first gent doesn't complete the courtesy turn with the fourth lady, instead he chains her to the second man, receives the second lady and chains her to the fourth gent…
B2:and this continues until everyone has their partners back — six (half) chains in total.
A3:“Do si ballonet”:  Ones lead on to the threes and form a ring; circle left half-way.  Give right hand to your opposite, and gents hand the ladies across to the other lady's place to form a ring with gents facing in, ladies facing out; all balance forward and back.
B3:Ladies hand partner across to the other gent's place; all balance forward and back.  Gents about turn to your left to face opposite, and do a right and left through.  This leaves the ones on the outside, so I'm guessing these two couples do a quick promenade round each other so that the threes are home and the ones are moving toward the fours as the start of the figure.
 Repeat all this, but at the end of the “Three ladies chain” the ones lead home and all swing.

Note: I also have my own dance called Three Ladies Chain which is based on the traditional figure but written long before I started researching Northern Junket.

Bunkhouse Reel        Bunkhouse Reel: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 17-Oct-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1958.  Original wording on page 16    Internet Archive

Hamilton Area - 1837
Introduced at the Hamilton Festival

Intro: Your choice

Figure:

First couple turn back to back
Go half way round the outside track
Opposite swing when you get there
And line up four with the corner pair
Forward eight and back like that
Four ladies grand chain across the track
Opposites left and star right back
Turn once and a half
Then the gents star right
Opposites left, you're doing fine
Star right back to the same old line
Head couple reel, a right hand reel
Back to the sides, a left hand reel
Reel in the centre when you get back
A once and a half, go across the track
For a left hand reel
And don't look back
Into the centre again with a once and a half
Everybody allemande left with your left hand
Right to your partner, right and left grand

Repeat for each couple in turn.

The tune “Bunkhouse Reel” (which is actually a jig!) appears in Northern Junket Volume 5 Number 5 on page 30.

As you may have seen in the earlier dances, “reel” means an elbow turn, once around if not specified.  But I couldn't see how the first couple got back to their corners for an allemande left.  A search on the web found a Sets in Order Yearbook which explains that the ones are doing a strip the willow to the other end of the set.  This version says “The headers reel” rather than “Head couple reel” which makes it clearer, but I should have noticed that Ralph says “Head couple” rather than “Head couples” so it's just the first couple leading the figure.  The Hamilton version has more action — the ladies star across and back, then the gents, whereas the Sets in Order version has one star for each so the ones end back at the top of the set near their home position.  Either will work; it just means that the Sets in Order version needs a grand chain half-way whereas the Hamilton version needs it all the way.  So sticking with Hamilton, try this for size:

A1:Ones separate, go half-way round the outside.  Quick swing with the threes and fall back with that person to side lines, man on the left.
A2:Lines of four forward and back.  All four ladies chain across.
B1:Ladies return with a right-hand star but instead of a courtesy turn you meet with an open left-hand turn 1½ to put the men in.
B2:Men right-hand star half-way and left-hand turn the opposite lady.  Men star right back again, and left-hand turn that lady to finish back in the original side lines.
A3+4:Ones strip the willow back to your end of what is now a longways set: right-elbow turn partner, back to the side person with a left-elbow turn, right to partner 1½, left to the next, partner right 1½ (so you're always going to the opposite sex) and as the ones approach the last person, all allemande left corner.
B3:Grand chain all the way round.  I would then probably add something like “In to the middle and back and all swing” to make it up to twice through the tune, but this isn't mentioned in either of the sources.

Presque Isle Eight        Crooked Stovepipe: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 8-Nov-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 7, December 1958.  Original wording on page 34    Internet Archive

Rod Linnell
Music - Crooked Stovepipe

Any introduction, break, and ending you prefer

All four gents to the right and swing
Four ladles star across the hall
Go halfway round and balance all
Balance and do si do
Swing a little bit on heel and toe
Put her on your right and here we go
Aliemande left the corner one
Do si do the one you swung
Go back to the corner maid
Take her with you and promenade

  - repeat three more times

Hofbrau Square        Print this danceTop of page   Added 8-Nov-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 8, February 1959.  Original wording on page 24    Internet Archive

Jerry Helt
Suggested music: Whatever you like, though Jerry used a recording of the German dance “The Tampet”.  As given here it is slightly different from the original, to fit our New England style of dancing.

Circle left halfway round
Head couples half right and left
Circle left halfway round
Side couples half right and left
Ladies half grand chain
Heads outside, half promenade
Ladies half grand chain
Sides inside, half promenade
All balance right, balance left, sashay to the right
All balance left, balance right, sashay to the left
Allemande left with your corner
Allemande right with your own
All four men left hand star
Swing your corners all
Take your corner and promenade all.

Repeat entire dance three more times
Use any ending you wish.

Here's how I would fit the figure to the music:

A1:All circle left half-way.  Heads right and left through.
A2:All circle left half-way.  Sides right and left through.  All now opposite home position.
B1:All four ladies chain across.  Heads promenade round the outside half-way — sides move in to give them room.
B2:All four ladies chain across.  Sides promenade round the outside half-way — heads move back to give them room.  All now home.
A3:All face partner: kick-balance to the right and to the left; four slips to the right.  Balance left and right; four slips to the left.
A4:Allemande left corner (a full 8 steps).  Allemande right partner.
B3:Men left-hand star ¾.  Swing corner.
B4:Promenade to the man's home place.

That means once through the figure is twice through a 32-bar tune.

Hofbräu is a German term meaning “royal brewer”.  It may refer to a kind of German beer or an informal, German-style restaurant or tavern.

Bring Home Your Corner        Print this danceTop of page   Added 8-Nov-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 9, March 1959.  Original wording on page 29    Internet Archive

Mal Hayden

Music - any square dance tune you like
Into,- breaks & ending, ad lib

Two head couples forward and back
Forward again, bring your corner home with you
And stand there four in line
Now forward eight and back
Forward again, pass through and turn alone
(the lady now on gent's right is his new partner)
Forward eight and back once more
Half right and left to place
And turn your new girl into place
Do si do your corners all
Do si do your own little doll
Swing your partner round in place
And promenade her once around

Repeat for the head couples
Repeat twice for the side couples

Montreal Breakthrough        Set de la Baie-St-Paul: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 8-Nov-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 10, October 1959.  Original wording on page 31    Internet Archive

Use any introduction, breaks and ending you like

To be truly French-Canadian, each couple should do the figure in turn.  This makes it a long dance and a shortened version is given here.  Either way is a good dance

The head two couples promenade the center (men passing left shoulders)
Go round that couple on your right
Right back home to place
Then right and left four with the couple you meet (original left hand couple)
Same two ladies half chain
Men, swing the girl coming to you
Same two men, brand new girls
Promenade the center (ladies passing right shoulders)
Go round that couple on your left
Right back home to place
Right and left four with the couple you meet (original right hand couple)
Same two ladies half chain
Men, swing the girl coming to you
Same two men, brand new girls
Promenade the center and pass through the opposite two
Ladies go right, men go left
Around the outside back to place
Head two couples half right and left
Side two couples half right and left
Right and left back at the head
Right and left back at the side
All four ladies grand chain half way
All swing partners.

Repeat for the side two couples

If you would like to give this a real French-Canadian ending try this:

Allemande left your comer
Allemande right your partner
Allemande left your corner again
Grand right and left half around
Allemande right your partner when you meet
Allemande left your corner
Allemande right your partner
Grand right and left to place

And if you end it with a 32 measure swing it will be the real McCoy!

Kitty Corner        The Stumbling Fiddler: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 8-Nov-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 11, December 1959.  Original wording on page 28    Internet Archive

Ralph Page

Any intro. breaks or ending you wish

Head two couples out to the right and circle four
Head men leave their ladies, go back home alone
Side men, turn the right hand lady by right hand round
Turn left hand lady by left hand around
With the right hand lady, right and left four
With left hand lady sashay four
Swing corners all, promenade the same
Repeat twice more for heads; three times for sides
Then: Swing your opposite lady, she's your own
All promenade your partners home.

As with Heads and Sides earlier, he calls the figure three times for the head gents and three times for the side gents, rather than the usual two for each, so the ladies have progressed all the way round the square and then half-way more — hence the final move.

This looks to me like a 48-bar figure, though it's quite possible that Ralph just called it across the music, especially given that final move.

A1:Heads lead out to the right and circle left with this side couple, but head men go home alone leaving side men with two ladies each.
A2:Side men turn your right-hand lady (partner) by the right — a full 8 steps.  Left-hand lady (corner) by the left.
B1:Side men and right-hand lady, with the other side man and his right-hand lady, right and left through, and back.
B2:Side men take left-hand lady in a ballroom hold: Gallop across to change places with the other pair, and back again.
C1:All long swing with corner.
C2:Promenade this new partner to the man's place.

Star and Chain        Year of Jubilo: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page   Added 8-Nov-22

From Northern Junket Vol. 6, No. 12, February 1960.  Original wording on page 32    Internet Archive

Ted Sannella
Suggested music “Year of Jubilo”
Any intro. breaks & endings you wish.

The two head couples promenade all the way around the ring
Same two couples into the center and make a left hand star
All the way round til home's in sight
Same two ladies chain to the right (half chain)
Turn 'em around and face the middle
Ladies grand chain in time to the fiddle (half way)
Turn that lady with an arm around
Take your corner and promenade round

Repeat for side couples as above.
Then repeat for heads and sides each once more.



Volume 7

Abe's Donegal        Back to Dnegal: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 7, No. 4, April 1961.  Original wording on page 32    Internet Archive
Music: Back to Donegal.  Original Square by Abe Kanegson

Any intro, chorus and ending you like.

All four gents turn out to the right
     (Gents turn out from set. go to stand beside right hand lady, passing behind partner)
And on the right remain
The ladies all turn out to the left
The ladies grand chain (half way)
You chain 'em over and turn 'em around
And swing the colleens all
Swing round and round with the girl you found
In Dear Old Donegal
Then allemande left your corner girl
Pass by the one you swung
With the next you meet you do si do
And promenade her home
You promenade that lady, promenade them all
Then forward all and back to place
     (One step balance forward and back toward center)
In Dear Old Donegal

Here's my understanding of the figure.  It's unusual to do a ladies chain followed by a swing, but certainly not impossible, though modern dancers might prefer to omit the courtesy turn and just have the ladies right-hand star half-way into a longer swing.  And I don't see why the forward and back should be just a balance step — I think there's time for a regular forward and back.

A1:Gents cast out over left shoulder to finish in the place of the next gent to the right.  Ladies cast out over right shoulder to finish in the place of the next lady to the left.  (All now with opposite)
A2:All four ladies chain across.  Swing this one.
B1:Allemande left (current) corner, pass by the one you swung.  Do-si-do the next (original corner).
B2:Promenade to the man's place.  All go forward and back.
 Ladies have moved right.

Antigonish Square        Print this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 7, No. 9, November 1962.  Original wording on page 29    Internet Archive
Original dance by Rod Linnell
Suggested music: Whatever you like.  Use any intro, break and ending you wish.

The head two ladies chain to the right (halfway)
And turn the girls around
Same two ladies chain across the square (halfway)
Allemande left your corners
Come back and do si do
Then all four men star by the right
Three-quarters round the ring
When you meet your partner (original)
Stop and give her a swing
Then take that lady with you and promenade
One full circle around the ring

Antigonish is a town in Antigonish County, Nova Scotia, Canada.  No difficulty understanding this one, except that if the men star right three-quarters they meet their opposite, not their original partner.  Coming out of a do-si-do, a left-hand star would be better than a right-hand star, and would also flow more smoothly into a swing, so I'm making that one small change.  I'm also assuming that “one full circle” means you promenade once around to this new place, rather than telling them they need to promenade 1¼ instead of just ¼

It's interesting that Rod has to say “halfway”.  In modern squares and contras it's taken for granted that a ladies chain or right and left through is one way only, but these figures both derive from the 19th century quadrille where they meant “and back again”.

A1:Head ladies chain to the right.  Same ladies chain across.
A2:Allemande left current corner.  Do-si-do current partner.
B1:Men star left ¾.  Swing original partner.
B2:Promenade all the way, which means all couples are one place to the left of where they started.
 Repeating the figure for the (new) heads and twice for the sides gets everybody home.


Volume 8

Old Fall River Line        On the Old Fall River Line: Music in PDF, MIDI and ABC formatPrint this danceTop of page

From Northern Junket Vol. 8, No. 7, January 1966.  Original wording on page 31    Internet Archive
as called by Paul Hunt and recorded by Folk Dancer on MH 1041
A singing quadrille for your “Dance of the 50 's” party

Any introduction you wish

The two head couples promenade half around the outside ring
Up the center and right and left through
Til you get back home again
Then you circle four with the couple on your right
Then you break and make two lines
Forward eight, and eight fall back On the Old Fall River Line
Then you chain your ladies 'cross, the set (don't return)
Chain the ladies down the side - -
Then you chain the girls across the set
Turn around and watch 'em go!
Then you chain 'em home, yes right back home
And hand them to their beaux.
Now you allemande left with your corner
And you allemande right with your own
You swing that corner lady there
You swing her all alone
Then you promenade with the one you swung
Hurry up, you're doing fine
Promenade like a big parade On the Old Fall River Line.

Repeat figure once more for head couples
Repeat figure twice more for side couples.

Any ending you wish.

Tony Parkes notes:

It's in Chip Hendrickson's “little black book,” which Walter Lenk has kindly made available online (page 10): www.configular.com/SingingSquares/ Chip_Hendricksons_CallBook.pdf

I have the original 78 disc of author Paul Hunt calling it.  His wording on the record is consistent with his book “Eight Yards of Calico” and with the two transcriptions above.  Note that there is an 8-count pause in the call at the end of the introduction, and two 4-count pauses in the middle of the figure.  Chip's transcription preserves these.  There is also an 8-count tag on the record at the end of each figure, to finish the promenade.  This tag is noted in Hunt's book but not in Ralph's or Chip's transcription.

The tune is of a popular song with music by Harry Von Tilzer — you can hear it sung at www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJrDwFJvCsI and there's a recording made (for a square dance, judging by the photos) at www.youtube.com/watch?v=06jaogauD-I which sounds as if it's in F though I've written it in G.  I assume the dance uses just the chorus (which is what the Rock Candy Mountaineers are playing on this recording).



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The rest of the page is my working area and shows you how much I still have to do.

A1:
A2:
B1:
B2:

TitleVol.No.Pg.
Rod's Reel (Rod Linnell)7129
Around Someone (Ralph Page)7229
La Russe *7233
Ladies Stay Home (Ralph Page)7341
Quadrille Joyeaux (Ted Sannella)7524
Avalon7639
Roger's Square (Roger Whynot) *7728
Empire State Chain (“Duke” Miller)7823
Dream Quadrille (Ted Sannella) *71036
Happy Dance (Rod Linnell) *71130
Reel Salle St. Andre (Ralph Page)71232
Jimmy's Jig (Rod Linnell) *8130
Lancers Quadrille, 5 Figs. (Pub S.T. Gordon, 1857)8134
Marching to Pretoria (Ralph Page) *8225
Lancers — Additional Figures8232
Jingle Bells (Rod Linnell)8330
Le Quadrille Francais8345
Circle to the Middle Quadrille (Ted Sannella)8427
Polka on a Banjo (Ralph Page)8527
Open Up Your Heart (as called by Don Armstrong)8630
Mountain Music Madness (Rod Linnell)8831
Bill Bailey8936
Wedding Bells — Breaking up — Old Gang of Mine81032
Wheels Quadrille (Dick Leger, arr. Ralph Page)81128
Centennial Lancers, The81140
Saratoga Lancers, The81142
Lancier from Quebec81138
Le Quadrille des Lanciers81219
Swiss Lancers81221
Ted's Atlantic Polka Quadrille (Ted Sannella)81227
Open Up Your Heart (as called by Don Armstrong)9131
Buffalo Quadrille (as called by Rod Linnell)9228
It's You I Love (as called by Jerry Helt)9326
Ted's Atlantic Polka Quadrille (Ted Sannella) *9423
Old Fashioned Girl9530
Nelly Bly9624
Dancing to Pretoria (Ralph Page)9722
Old Fall River Line (Paul Hunt)9826
Milton Quadrille (Rod Linnell)9928
Left Hand Lady Under (Trad.) *91023
End Ladies Chain (as called by “Duke” Miller)91128
George's Special (George Hodgson)91223
Little Arrows (Ralph Sweet) *10125
Jenny's Star (Roger Whynot)10229
Girl I Left Behind Me (“Duke” Miller, caller) *10321
Oblah-Di-Oblah-Da (as called by Dick Leger)10329
Deer Park Lancers (as arranged by Ralph Page)10421
Charlie's Double Quadrille (Charlie Baldwin)10422
Rod's “Real Yankee” Square (Rod Linnell)10424
Duke & Ralph's Dance (Called by “Duke” Miller)10425
Mal Hayden's Texas Star Variation1055
Butcher Arms Around Me, Honey (Walter Meier)1056
Canadian Balance Quadrille (Dick Leger)1057
Wait 'Til the Sun Shines Nellie10527
Roger's Dance #2 (Roger Whynot)10626
Stand Right There (Josh Tolford)10826
Patter Chatter (Van Vandever)10920
Forward Six & the Gents Pass Under (Bob Osgood)10926
Just Because (as called by Lawrence Loy)101029
Year End Two Step (Rod Linnell) *101127
Tipperary (as called by George Hodgson Jr.)101225
Between Those Ladies (Ed Gilmore via “Duke” Miller)11124
Southern Quadrille (as called by Don Armstrong)11224
Solomon Levi11228
Chain the Ladies Thru the Sides (Dick Best)11326
Rockingham Star (as called by Rod Linnell)11426
Stepney Chain (as called by A1 Brundage)11528
Farmer's Quadrille (as called by Don Armstrong)11624
Four in Line You Travel11724
Figure Eight Around Sides (Ralph Page)11825
Johnny Oh Polka Sq. (Dick Leger's favorite-4/74)11935
Gonna Have A Ball (Bruce Johnson's favorite 4/74)11939
East Hill Breakdown (as called by Rod Linnell)111144
Rod's Right And Left (Rod Linnell)111225
East Hill Reel (Rod Linnell)12124
Ladies Round One (Roger Whynot)12225
Swing on the Outside (Roger Whynot)12225
Rod's Donegal (Rod Linnell)12326
Lady Be Good To Me (Ed Gilmore)12425
McQuillen's Breakdown (Ralph Page)12529
Ladies Chain Down The Center & …. (Dick Best)12630
Long Pond Chain (Rod Linnell)12726
Put Your Arms Around Me, Honey (Walter Meier)12830
Dayton Square (Ralph Page)12926
Send Me The Pillow (Ralph Page)121027
Sides Star (Ralph Page)121127
Cheat or Swing (Traditional)13133
Carry the Swing (Kansas Traditional)1327
Down the Center & Cast Off Two (Kansas Trad.)1327
Run Away With Your Corner Girl (Kansas Trad.)1327
Bird in the Cage (Kansas Traditional)1328
Catch 'Em on the Fly (Kansas Traditional)1328
Runouttanames (Ed Gilmore)13226
Round Just One (Don Armstrong)13329
Trailin' Star (Jim York)13426
Cape Breton Square (Ralph Page from Rod Linnell)13525
Floor Walker (Jim York)13629
Patter, Where Did It Go?13642
Benson's Fireplace (Roger Whynot)1479
Nameityourself (Van Wanderwalker)13723
Patter, Old Time- Whatever Became of It?13724
Bill Bailey (“Duke” Miller)14725
Happy Sounds Quadrille (Ralph Page)13826
Patter, Old Time- Whatever Became of It?13831
Jingle Bells (Ralph Page)13926
Levi Jackson Rag (Pat Shaw)131026
Grand Old Flag (Stan Burdick via Bob Howell)131128
Labor Day Quadrille (Roger Whynot)131227
Pretty Baby Quadrille (Jerry Helt)131229
On The Bias (Roger Whynot)131227
Tony's Star Breakdown (Tony Parkes)131229
Northern Quadrille (Keith Hunt)14128
On The Bias (Roger Whynot)14227
Do Si Do and Face the Sides (Ted Sannella)14227
Butterfly Promenade (Ed Butenhof)14228
Hope Quadrille (Bob Howell)14229
Newfoundland Lancers (from Roger Whynot)14317
Mixed Quadrille (Ralph Page)14327
Right and Left Eight (Ralph Page)14327
Wearin' 0' The Green (“Corky” Calkins)14329
Couple Around One (Ed Gilmore)14430
Roger's Dance (Roger Whynot)14431
Hey In A Square (Roger Whynot)14430
Recombining Basics for New Dances (From Callerlab)14432
Virginia Reel Square (called by George Hodgson)14524
Grand Square Variations (Bob Osgood)14525
Lady Be Good To Me (Ed Gilmore)14627
Nottingham Breakdown (Henry Garfath)14627
My Little Girl (As called by Ralph Page)14720
Sheehan's Reel (Roger Whynot)14723
Swanee (Howie Davison)14723
Just Because (as called by “Duke” Miller)14822
Karin's Quadrille (Roger Whynot)14824
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